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Effect of Beta-Blocker Therapy on QTc Response in Exercise and Recovery in Normal Subjects

Information source: MetroHealth Medical Center
Information obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov on November 03, 2008
Link to the current ClinicalTrials.gov record.

Condition(s) targeted: Long QT Syndrome; Cardiac Repolarization

Intervention: Placebo (Drug); Propranolol LA (Drug)

Phase: N/A

Status: Recruiting

Sponsored by: MetroHealth Medical Center

Official(s) and/or principal investigator(s):
Elizabeth S Kaufman, MD, Principal Investigator, Affiliation: MetroHealth Medical Center

Overall contact:
Elizabeth S Kaufman, MD, Phone: 216-778-2349, Email: ekaufman@metrohealth.org

Summary

Background. In congenital long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1), episodes of ventricular tachycardia are usually triggered by exercise and can be prevented in most patients by beta-blocker therapy. In addition, LQT1 associated with a normal resting QT interval can be unmasked by the abnormal QT response to exercise testing (failure of the QT interval to shorten normally). Preliminary data from our laboratory show that the exercise QT intervals of patients with LQT1 are partially normalized by beta-blocker therapy. It is still currently not known if beta-blockers modify the QT/heart rate relationship (a primary effect on repolarization) or if the "normalizing" effect is due to the inability of subjects on beta-blockers to attain sufficiently high workloads (due to reduced heart rate) for prolongation to occur. Moreover, the physiologic response of the exercise QT interval to beta-blockers in healthy control subjects is not known.

Objective. The objective of this study is to define the impact of beta-blocker therapy on the QT response to exercise and recovery in normal subjects.

Methods. Approximately 36 healthy adult subjects age-matched to previously studied LQT1 subjects will undergo 1) screening history, 2) two weeks of beta-blocker therapy ending in an exercise test, and 3) two weeks of placebo therapy ending in an exercise test. Beta blocker and placebo will be given in random order in a double-blind fashion. The QT response to exercise and recovery will be compared between drug-free and beta-blocker-treated states. These data will be compared to those previously collected for LQT1 subjects.

Implications. These results will provide new information about the effect of beta-blocker therapy on repolarization parameters in normal subjects, and will provide a context in which to interpret the previous findings that beta-blocker administration modifies the QT response to exercise in LQT1 subjects.

Clinical Details

Official title: Effect of Beta-Blocker Therapy on QTc Response in Exercise and Recovery in Normal Subjects

Study design: Basic Science, Randomized, Double Blind (Subject, Investigator), Placebo Control, Crossover Assignment

Primary outcome: QTc response to exercise on versus off beta-blocker

Secondary outcome: Comparison of QT response to exercise in healthy subjects to QT response to exercise in subjects with long QT syndrome (data previously collected)

Eligibility

Minimum age: 18 Years. Maximum age: 55 Years. Gender(s): Both.

Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria:

- Healthy normal adults, age- and gender-matched to previously studied LQT1 subjects

Exclusion Criteria:

- Cardiac disease

- Diabetes

- Hypertension

- Severe allergic reaction

- Asthma requiring treatment

- Use of medications other than oral contraceptives, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal

anti-inflammatory drugs, or synthroid or other thyroid medications

- Pregnancy (subjects will be asked if they are pregnant)

- Inability to sign informed consent

Locations and Contacts

Elizabeth S Kaufman, MD, Phone: 216-778-2349, Email: ekaufman@metrohealth.org

MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44109, United States; Recruiting
Additional Information

Starting date: August 2007
Last updated: January 11, 2008

Page last updated: November 03, 2008

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