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High-dose Chemotherapy for Poor-prognosis Relapsed Germ-Cell Tumors

Information source: M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
ClinicalTrials.gov processed this data on August 23, 2015
Link to the current ClinicalTrials.gov record.

Condition(s) targeted: Testicular Cancer

Intervention: Gemcitabine (Drug); Docetaxel (Drug); Melphalan (Drug); Carboplatin (Drug); Mesna (Drug); Ifosfamide (Drug); Etoposide (Drug); Stem Cell Transplant (Procedure)

Phase: Phase 2

Status: Recruiting

Sponsored by: M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Official(s) and/or principal investigator(s):
Yago Nieto, MD, PHD, Study Chair, Affiliation: M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Overall contact:
Yago Nieto, MD, PHD, Phone: 713-792-8750

Summary

The goal of this clinical research study is to learn if 2 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy can help to control germ-cell tumors. The first cycle of chemotherapy will include the drugs gemcitabine, docetaxel, melphalan, and carboplatin. The second cycle of chemotherapy will include the drugs ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide. The safety of these drug combinations will also be studied.

Clinical Details

Official title: High-dose Chemotherapy for Poor-prognosis Relapsed Germ-Cell Tumors

Study design: Allocation: Non-Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Primary outcome: 2-year Event-Free Survival (EFS)

Detailed description: The Study Drugs: Carboplatin, melphalan, and ifosfamide are designed to damage the DNA (the genetic material) of cancer cells, which may cause the cancer cells to die. Docetaxel and etoposide are designed to stop the growth of cancer cells, which may cause the cancer cells to die. Gemcitabine is designed to disrupt the growth of cancer cells, which may cause cancer cells to die. It may also help docetaxel, carboplatin, and melphalan to be more effective by stopping tumor cells from repairing damage caused by these drugs. Study Drug Administration: You will receive 2 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support, 1-2 months apart. Starting on the first day of your hospital stay, you will begin gargling and swishing Caphosol and Glutamine in your mouth 4 times a day. This is done to help prevent mouth and throat sores. On Day 2 of your stay in the hospital, through the CVC, you will receive gemcitabine over 4 hours and docetaxel over 2 hours. On Days 3-5, through the CVC, you will receive gemcitabine over 4 hours, melphalan over 15 minutes, and carboplatin over 2 hours. On Day 6, you will not receive any study drugs. On Day 7, you will receive the stem cells through the CVC over about 30-60 minutes. As part of standard care, you will receive G-CSF (filgrastim) as an injection under your skin daily, starting 5 days after the transplant, until your blood cell levels return to normal. As part of standard mouth care you will be asked to do mouthwashes 4 times a day with caphosol (artificial saliva) and glutamine. Two (2) to 4 weeks after you leave the hospital after Cycle 1, you will receive your second cycle of high-dose chemotherapy. On Days 2-4 of your stay in the hospital, through the CVC, you will receive ifosfamide over 6 hours, etoposide over 2 hours, and carboplatin over 2 hours. On Days 5-6, you will not receive any study drugs. On Day 7, you will receive the stem cells through the CVC over about 30-60 minutes. Study Visits: About 1 month, 100 days, 6 months and 1 year after your second stem cell transplant, the following tests and procedures will be performed:

- To check the status of the disease, you will have CT scans of your chest, abdomen, and

pelvis.

- Blood (about 3 tablespoons) will be drawn for routine tests.

Length of Study: You will be off study after about 1 year from your second transplant. You will be taken off study early if the disease gets worse or if you experience any intolerable side effects. Long-Term Follow-up: If your doctor thinks it is needed, you may have follow-up visits. This is an investigational study. Gemcitabine, docetaxel, melphalan, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide are all FDA-approved and commercially available for the treatment of germ-cell tumors. Up to 67 patients will be enrolled in this study.

Eligibility

Minimum age: 12 Years. Maximum age: 65 Years. Gender(s): Both.

Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: 1. Male or female patients, age 12 to 65 years. 2. Patients with seminomatous or nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors (GCT) in one of the following groups: A) First relapse or progression or second response with an intermediate or high risk according to the Beyer model. B) Second relapse or beyond. 3. Adequate renal glomerular and tubular function, as defined by estimated serum creatinine clearance >/=50 ml/min and/or serum creatinine /=50% of predicted, corrected for volume and hemoglobin. 6. Adequate cardiac function with LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction) >/=40%. No uncontrolled arrhythmias or symptomatic cardiac disease. 7. Zubrod performance status 0-2. 8. A minimum apheresis collection of 5 million CD34+ cells/kg of autologous hematopoietic progenitor cells (AHPC). 9. Written informed consent by patients and/ or their parents or legal guardians. Assent for those patients inclusive of ages 12 to 17. Exclusion Criteria: 1. Growing teratoma syndrome, defined as enlarging tumor masses with normal serum markers during chemotherapy for nonseminomatous GCT. 2. Major surgery within 30 days before the initiation of study treatment 3. Radiotherapy within 21 days prior to initiation of study treatment 4. Prior whole brain irradiation. 5. Patients with active central nervous system (CNS) disease, defined as brain or meningeal metastases that are not in complete remission. 6. Patients with active hepatitis B, either active carrier (HBsAg +) or viremic (HBV DNA >/=10,000 copies/mL, or >/= 2,000 IU/mL). 7. Evidence of either cirrhosis or stage 3-4 liver fibrosis in patients who either show chronic hepatitis C or positive hepatitis C serology. 8. Active infection requiring parenteral antibiotics. 9. HIV infection, unless the patient is receiving effective antiretroviral therapy with undetectable viral load and normal CD4 counts 10. Patients who have had a previous autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant in the previous 12 months. 11. Positive pregnancy test in a female patient of childbearing potential defined as not post menopausal for twelve months or no previous surgical sterilization.

Locations and Contacts

Yago Nieto, MD, PHD, Phone: 713-792-8750

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77007, United States; Recruiting
Yago Nieto, MD, PHD, Principal Investigator

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, Seattle, Washington 98109, United States; Recruiting

Additional Information

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Website

Starting date: June 2009
Last updated: March 11, 2015

Page last updated: August 23, 2015

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