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Uniretic (Moexipril Hydrochloride / Hydrochlorothiazide) - Summary

 
 



USE IN PREGNANCY

When used in pregnancy during the second and third trimesters, ACE inhibitors can cause injury and even death to the developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, uniretic® should be discontinued as soon as possible. See WARNINGS, Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality.

 

UNIRETIC SUMMARY

uniretic® tablets
(moexipril HCl / hydrochlorothiazide)
7.5 mg/12.5 mg
15 mg/12.5 mg
15 mg/25 mg
Rx Only

uniretic® (moexipril hydrochloride/hydrochlorothiazide) is a combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, moexipril hydrochloride, and a diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. Moexipril hydrochloride is a fine white to off-white powder. It is soluble (about 10% weight-to-volume) in distilled water at room temperature.

uniretic® is indicated for treatment of patients with hypertension. This fixed combination is not indicated for the initial therapy of hypertension (DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

In using uniretic®, consideration should be given to the fact that another ACE inhibitor, captopril, has caused agranulocytosis, particularly in patients with renal impairment or collagen-vascular disease. Available data are insufficient to show that uniretic® does not have a similar risk (see WARNINGS, Neutropenia/Agranulocytosis). In addition, ACE inhibitors, for which adequate data are available, cause a higher rate of angioedema in black than in nonblack patients (see WARNINGS, Angioedema).


See all Uniretic indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Media Articles Related to Uniretic (Moexipril / Hydrochlorothiazide)

Calorie restriction improves sleep apnea, hypertension in obese people
Source: Hypertension News From Medical News Today [2014.09.12]
Restricting calories may improve obstructive sleep apnea and reduce high blood pressure in obese adults, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure...

Hypertension up to Six Times More Likely in Obese vs Slim Youth
Source: theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology Headlines [2014.09.10]
Overweight and obese boys and girls were much more likely to have hypertension than normal-weight children in a new study; thus, weight loss should be encouraged to reduce later CVD risk.
Heartwire

Hypertension is a nearly 6 fold risk factor in obese youths
Source: Hypertension News From Medical News Today [2014.09.03]
Obese youths have a nearly six fold risk of hypertension, according to research in more than 22 000 young people from the PEP Family Heart Study presented at ESC Congress by Professor Peter Schwandt...

Stroke risk increased by resistant hypertension: 35 percent in women and 20 percent in elderly Taiwanese
Source: Hypertension News From Medical News Today [2014.09.03]
Resistant hypertension increases the risk of stroke by 35% in women and 20% in elderly Taiwanese patients, according to research presented at ESC Congress by Dr Kuo-Yang Wang from Taiwan.

Potential to treat pulmonary hypertension with protein in 'good cholesterol'
Source: Cholesterol News From Medical News Today [2014.09.01]
Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis.

more news >>

Published Studies Related to Uniretic (Moexipril / Hydrochlorothiazide)

Comparison between moexipril and atenolol in obese postmenopausal women with hypertension. [1998.09.20]
The present study investigated the effect of the new ACE-inhibitor moexipril versus the beta 1-adrenergic blocker atenolol on metabolic parameters, adverse events (AEs) and sitting systolic (SSBP) and sitting diastolic blood pressure (SDBP) in obese postmenopausal women with hypertension (stage I and II)...

Antihypertensive treatment in postmenopausal women: results from a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study comparing an ACE inhibitor (moexipril) with a diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide). [1998.05]
The present study was designed to compare the safety and efficacy of the new angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor moexipril with that of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in postmenopausal women with mild-to-moderate hypertension. After a 4-week single-blind placebo period, 97 postmenopausal hypertensive women (42-74 years of age) with a sitting diastolic blood pressure (SDBP) of 95-114 mm Hg were randomized to receive either once daily moexipril 15 mg or HCTZ 25 mg for a 12-week double-blind treatment period.

Antihypertensive effectiveness of a very low fixed-dose combination of moexipril and hydrochlorothiazide. [1998.03]
The antihypertensive and metabolic effects of a fixed combination of very low dose of moexipril (MO), an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) were tested in a multicenter, placebo (PBO) controlled, double-blind, parallel study of men (M) and women (W) with mild to moderate essential hypertension.

Usefulness of moexipril and hydrochlorothiazide in moderately severe essential hypertension. [1997.04]
The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor moexipril alone and in combination with hydrochlorothiazide versus hydrochlorothiazide monotherapy in patients with stage II and III essential hypertension.There is also an additive effect when combining the two agents that lowers BP more significantly than either monotherapy.

Antihypertensive treatment with moexipril plus HCTZ vs metoprolol plus HCTZ in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. [1997.02]
Combination therapy with the new ACE inhibitor moexipril plus hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) results in significant blood pressure (BP) reductions. This study compares the efficacy and safety of moexipril plus HCTZ to that of a standard combination treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension...

more studies >>


Page last updated: 2014-09-12

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