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Streptomycin (Streptomycin) - Summary

 
 



WARNING

THE RISK OF SEVERE NEUROTOXIC REACTIONS IS SHARPLY INCREASED IN PATIENTS WITH IMPAIRED RENAL FUNCTION OR PRE-RENAL AZOTEMIA. THESE INCLUDE DISTURBANCES OF VESTIBULAR AND COCHLEAR FUNCTION. OPTIC NERVE DYSFUNCTION, PERIPHERAL NEURITIS, ARACHNOIDITIS, AND ENCEPHALOPATHY MAY ALSO OCCUR. THE INCIDENCE OF CLINICALLY DETECTABLE, IRREVERSIBLE VESTIBULAR DAMAGE IS PARTICULARLY HIGH IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH STREPTOMYCIN.

RENAL FUNCTION SHOULD BE MONITORED CAREFULLY; PATIENTS WITH RENAL IMPAIRMENT AND/OR NITROGEN RETENTION SHOULD RECEIVE REDUCED DOSAGES. THE PEAK SERUM CONCENTRATION IN INDIVIDUALS WITH KIDNEY DAMAGE SHOULD NOT EXCEED 20 TO 25 MCG/ML.

THE CONCURRENT OR SEQUENTIAL USE OF OTHER NEUROTOXIC AND/OR NEPHROTOXIC DRUGS WITH STREPTOMYCIN SULFATE, INCLUDING NEOMYCIN, KANAMYCIN, GENTAMICIN, CEPHALORIDINE, PAROMOMYCIN, VIOMYCIN, POLYMYXIN B, COLISTIN, TOBRAMYCIN AND CYCLOSPORINE SHOULD BE AVOIDED.

THE NEUROTOXICITY OF STREPTOMYCIN CAN RESULT IN RESPIRATORY PARALYSIS FROM NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKAGE, ESPECIALLY WHEN THE DRUG IS GIVEN SOON AFTER THE USE OF ANESTHESIA OR OF MUSCLE RELAXANTS.

THE ADMINISTRATION OF STREPTOMYCIN IN PARENTERAL FORM SHOULD BE RESERVED FOR PATIENTS WHERE ADEQUATE LABORATORY AND AUDIOMETRIC TESTING FACILITIES ARE AVAILABLE DURING THERAPY.

 

STREPTOMYCIN SUMMARY

Streptomycin Sulfate Injection, USP
1 g/2.5 mL Ampoules

Streptomycin is a water-soluble aminoglycoside derived from Streptomyces griseus. It is marketed as the sulfate salt of streptomycin. Streptomycin sulfate is a bactericidal antibiotic. It acts by interfering with normal protein synthesis.

Streptomycin is indicated for the treatment of individuals with moderate to severe infections caused by susceptible strains of microorganisms in the specific conditions listed below:

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, the American Thoracic Society, and the Center for Disease Control recommend that either streptomycin or ethambutol be added as a fourth drug in a regimen containing isoniazid (INH), rifampin and pyrazinamide for initial treatment of tuberculosis unless the likelihood of INH or rifampin resistance is very low. The need for a fourth drug should be reassessed when the results of susceptibility testing are known. In the past when the national rate of primary drug resistance to isoniazid was known to be less than 4% and was either stable or declining, therapy with two and three drug regimens was considered adequate. If community rates of INH resistance are currently less than 4%, an initial treatment regimen with less than four drugs may be considered.
    Streptomycin is also indicated for therapy of tuberculosis when one or more of the above drugs is contraindicated because of toxicity or intolerance. The management of tuberculosis has become more complex as a consequence of increasing rates of drug resistance and concomitant HIV infection. Additional consultation from experts in the treatment of tuberculosis may be desirable in those settings.
  2. Non-tuberculosis infections: The use of streptomycin should be limited to the treatment of infections caused by bacteria which have been shown to be susceptible to the antibacterial effects of streptomycin and which are not amenable to therapy with less potentially toxic agents.

  1. Pasteurella pestis (plague),
  2. Francisella tularensis (tularemia),
  3. Brucella,
  4. Calymmatobacterium granulomatis (donovanosis, granuloma inguinale),
  5. H. ducreyi (chancroid),
  6. H. influenzae (in respiratory, endocardial, and meningeal infections--concomitantly with another antibacterial agent),
  7. K. pneumoniae pneumonia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent),
  8. E. coli, Proteus, A. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infections,
  9. Streptococcus viridans, Enterococcus faecalis (in endocardial infections--concomitantly with penicillin),
  10. Gram-negative bacillary bacteremia (concomitantly with another antibacterial agent).


See all Streptomycin indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Streptomycin

Comparison of the efficacy of gentamicin for 5 days plus doxycycline for 8 weeks versus streptomycin for 2 weeks plus doxycycline for 45 days in the treatment of human brucellosis: a randomized clinical trial. [2010.05]
OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy of gentamicin for 5 days plus doxycycline for 8 weeks with streptomycin for 2 weeks plus doxycycline for 45 days in the treatment of human brucellosis... CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the efficacy of gentamicin for 5 days plus doxycycline for 8 weeks is not superior to that of streptomycin for 2 weeks plus doxycycline for 45 days.

Efficacy of gentamicin plus doxycycline versus streptomycin plus doxycycline in the treatment of brucellosis in humans. [2006.04.15]
BACKGROUND: In the treatment of human brucellosis, antibiotic regimens containing an aminoglycoside are reportedly associated with fewer relapses... CONCLUSIONS: The combination of oral doxycycline for 45 days plus intramuscular gentamicin for 7 days is equally as effective as traditional therapy using doxycycline for 45 days plus streptomycin for 14 days.

Efficacy of the combination rifampin-streptomycin in preventing growth of Mycobacterium ulcerans in early lesions of Buruli ulcer in humans. [2005.08]
Mycobacterium ulcerans disease is common in some humid tropical areas, particularly in parts of West Africa, and current management is by surgical excision of skin lesions ranging from early nodules to extensive ulcers (Buruli ulcer). Antibiotic therapy would be more accessible to patients in areas of Buruli ulcer endemicity...

Comparison of the efficacy of a subunit and a live streptomycin-dependent porcine pleuropneumonia vaccine. [2004.06]
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of two new-generation porcine pleuropneumonia vaccines when challenged with Australian isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae of serovars 1 and 15... CONCLUSIONS: Both of the vaccines provided significant protection against a severe challenge with serovar 1 A pleuropneumoniae. Neither vaccine was effective against a serovar 15 A pleuropneumoniae challenge. There was evidence that the Porcilis APP vaccine did provide some protection against the serovar 15 challenge because the ADG, after challenge of pigs given this vaccine, was greater than the control pigs.

The early bactericidal activity of streptomycin. [2002.08]
SETTING: Patients with sputum smear-positive, newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis studied at Tygerburg Hospital, Cape Town, for their early response to streptomycin (SM). OBJECTIVE: To determine the standard early bactericidal activity (EBA), namely the fall in viable counts of tubercle bacilli in 16-hour sputum collections during the first 2 days of treatment with SM... CONCLUSIONS: The low EBAs show that SM has low, dose-related, bactericidal activity in cavities, consistent with results from clinical trials. If streptomycin-resistant bacilli are present, paromomycin is probably the aminoglycoside of choice.

more studies >>

Clinical Trials Related to Streptomycin

BURULICO Drug Trial Study Protocol: RCT SR8/SR4+CR4, GHANA [Active, not recruiting]
The standard for treatment Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) used to be surgery but the WHO now advises streptomycin (S, 15 mg/kg daily, intramuscularly) and rifampicin (R,10 mg/kg daily) along with surgery. This preliminary advice was based on observations in 21 patients with pre-ulcerative lesions of BUD, who were given daily SR treatment for varying periods of time. In patients treated with SR for at least 4 weeks, M. ulcerans could no longer be cultured from excised lesions. SR has been introduced without a formal evaluation or comparison with other treatments have been conducted or published, but the impression is that this treatment is beneficial and may cure BUD without additional surgical management.

This study protocol evaluates the hypothesis that early, limited lesions of BUD(pre-ulcerative or ulcerated lesions, ≤ 10 cm maximum diameter), can be healed without recurrence using antimycobacterial drug therapy, without the need for debridement surgery.

In endemic regions in Ghana, patients will be actively recruited and followed if ≥ 5 years of age, and with early (i. e., onset < 6 months) BUD.

- consent by patients and / or care givers / legal representatives

- clinical evaluation, and by

- analysis of three 0. 3 cm punch biopsies under local anaesthesia.

- disease confirmation: dry reagent-based polymerase chain reaction (DRB-PCR IS2404)

- randomization: either SR for 8 weeks, or 4 weeks of SR followed by R and clarithromycin

(C)

- stratification: ulcerative or pre-ulcerative lesions.

Biopsies will be processed for histopathology, DRB-PCR-, microscopy, culture, genomic, and sensitivity tests. Lesions will be assessed regularly for progression or healing during treatment. Drug toxicity monitoring includes blood cell counts, liver enzymes and renal tests; and ECG and audiographic tests.

Primary endpoint: healing without recurrence at 12 months follow-up after start of treatment Secondary endpoint: reduction in lesion surface area and/or clinically assessed improvement on completion of treatment, averting the need for debridement surgery.

Recurrences will be biopsied for confirmation, using PCR, histopathology, and culture. Sample size: 200 patients, with 2x74 evaluable patients to be randomized; 80% power to detect a difference of 20 % in recurrence-free cure 12 months after start of treatment between the two groups (60 versus 80%). A Data Safety and Monitoring Board will make interim analyses.

Pilot Randomized Study of Paromomycin (Aminosidine) Vs Streptomycin for Uncomplicated Pulmonary Tuberculosis [Completed]
OBJECTIVES: I. Compare the pharmacokinetics and early bactericidal activity of paromomycin (aminosidine) vs streptomycin for the treatment of uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis.

II. Compare the tolerability of these two drugs in these patients. III. Establish the relationships between achieved serum concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and early bactericidal activity of paromomycin and streptomycin.

Treatment and Diagnosis of Plague [Recruiting]
This clinical trial will compare the effectiveness of streptomycin, which historically is the standard drug for treatment of plague, with gentamicin. The hypothesis is that gentamicin is not inferior to streptomycin but that it will have less severe side effects. The study is being done in Madagascar because that country reports the most plague cases in the world. Patients coming into a participating clinic with suspected plague (bubonic, pneumonic, or septicemic) will be randomized into one of two treatment arms after giving informed consent. Patients will be monitored for side effects and for improvement of symptoms.

In addition, rapid diagnostic test strips have been developed but not fully evaluated for use on humans. The investigators will evaluate these new tests on specimens from the same patients, comparing their performance with that of classical diagnostic methods such as culture and serology.

WHO Drug Study for Buruli Ulcer - Comparison of SR8 and CR8 [Recruiting]
This is a WHO-sponsored trial. Combination therapy with streptomycin and rifampicin has been the standard antibiotic treatment for M. ulcerans infection since 2004. In March 2010, a WHO Technical Advisory Group recommended that a trial be carried out to develop a fully oral treatment for the disease. Although the current treatment is effective, injection with streptomycin is a problem. Several small observational studies (published and unpublished) have shown that a fully oral treatment is promising. This WHO sponsored study will be a randomized, controlled open label non-inferiority phase II/III, multi-centre trial (1 centre in Benin and 4 centres in Ghana), with two parallel treatment groups. The ultimate goal is to search for an effective alternative treatment to the current standard WHO-recommended therapy for all forms of Buruli ulcer, which includes injections of streptomycin with inherent logistic, operational and safety disadvantages. Financial and material support: 1. American Leprosy Missions, USA 2. Raoul Follereau Foundation, France 3. MAP International, USA 4. Sanofi, France 5. 7th Framework Programme of the European Union: BuruliVac project (241500) 6. Aranz Medical Limited, New Zealand

A Prospective Study of Multidrug Resistance and a Pilot Study of the Safety of and Clinical and Microbiologic Response to Levofloxacin in Combination With Other Antimycobacterial Drugs for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis (MDRTB) in HIV-Infected Patients. [Completed]
To determine the demographic, behavioral, clinical, and geographic risk factors associated with the occurrence of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDRTB). To evaluate the clinical and microbiological responses and overall survival of MDRTB patients who are treated with levofloxacin-containing multiple-drug regimens chosen from a hierarchical list. Per 9/28/94 amendment, to assess whether persistent or recurrent positive sputum cultures of patients who show failure or relapse are due to the same strain or reinfection with a new strain.

Among TB patients, there has been an increase in progressive disease due to the emergence of antimycobacterial drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Failure to identify patients at high risk for MDRTB increases the hazard for both treatment failure and development of resistance to additional therapeutic agents. Efforts to improve survival in patients with MDRTB will depend on improved methods of assessing the risk of acquisition of MDRTB and identifying drug susceptibility patterns in a timely fashion.

more trials >>

Reports of Suspected Streptomycin Side Effects

Pyrexia (6)Drug Ineffective (5)Hypocalcaemia (5)Rash (5)Vitamin D Deficiency (3)Hepatic Function Abnormal (3)Lymphadenopathy (3)Hypokalaemia (3)Mycobacterium Avium Complex Infection (3)Interstitial Lung Disease (3)more >>


Page last updated: 2010-10-05

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