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Scopolamine (Scopolamine Hydrobromide) - Summary

 
 



SCOPOLAMINE SUMMARY

Scopolamine Hydrobromide Injection, USP is a sterile solution of scopolamine hydrobromide (C17H21NO4 * HBr * 3H2O) in Water for Injection.   The injection is preserved with methylparaben 0.18% and propylparaben 0.02%.   Scopolamine Hydrobromide Injection is intended for intramuscular, intravenous and subcutaneous use.   The pH (3.5-6.5) is adjusted with hydrobromic acid if necessary.

Scopolamine Hydrobromide Injection, USP is indicated as a sedative and tranquilizing depressant to the central nervous system.  In its peripheral actions, scopolamine differs from atropine in that it is a stronger blocking agent for the iris, ciliary body and salivary, bronchial and sweat glands but is weaker in its action on the heart (in which it is incapable of exerting actions in tolerated doses), the intestinal tract and bronchial musculature.

In addition to the usual uses for antimuscarinic drugs, scopolamine is employed for its central depressant actions as a sedative.  Frequently it is given as a preanesthetic medicament for both its sedative-tranquilizing and antisecretory actions.  It is an effective antiemetic.  It is used in maniacal states, in delirium tremens and in obstetrics.  As a mydriatic and cycloplegic, it has a somewhat shorter duration (3 to 7 days) and intraocular pressure is affected less markedly than with atropine.


See all Scopolamine indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Scopolamine

Potential of pretreatment neural activity in the visual cortex during emotional processing to predict treatment response to scopolamine in major depressive disorder. [2013]
information can predict treatment response to scopolamine in MDD... CONCLUSION: These results implicate cholinergic and visual processing dysfunction

Randomized, double-blind comparison of oral aprepitant alone compared with aprepitant and transdermal scopolamine for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting. [2012]
and vomiting (PONV) treated with oral aprepitant with or without scopolamine... CONCLUSIONS: This trial evaluating the effectiveness of aprepitant alone and in

A comparison of cinnarizine and transdermal scopolamine for the prevention of seasickness in naval crew: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study. [2012]
reactions... CONCLUSIONS: Higher efficacy, a lower rate of adverse reactions, and convenience

The effects of the glycine reuptake inhibitor R213129 on the central nervous system and on scopolamine-induced impairments in psychomotor and cognitive function in healthy subjects. [2010]
In this study the effects of R213129, a selective glycine transporter 1 inhibitor, on central nervous system function were investigated in healthy males in the absence and presence of scopolamine. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 4-period crossover ascending dose study evaluating the following endpoints: body sway, saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements, pupillometry, electroencephalography, visual analogue scales for alertness, mood, calmness and psychedelic effects, adaptive tracking, finger tapping, Visual and Verbal Learning Task, Stroop test, hormone levels and pharmacokinetics.

Replication of scopolamine's antidepressant efficacy in major depressive disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. [2010]
replicate this finding in an independent sample limited to unipolar depressives... CONCLUSIONS: These results replicate previous finding that scopolamine produces a

more studies >>

Clinical Trials Related to Scopolamine

Roflumilast and Donepezil to Reverse Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Deficits in Healthy Adults [Completed]
The purpose of this study is to determine whether scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment is attenuated by the administration of roflumilast in combination with donepezil.

Comparison of Aprepitant Versus Aprepitant and Transdermal Scopolamine for Preventing Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting [Completed]
The purpose of this study is to compare the incidence of nausea, vomiting, need for rescue medication, prolonged PACU time, and unplanned hospital admission in patients with high risk for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) treated with oral aprepitant with or without transdermal scopolamine preoperatively.

Scopolamine Challenge Study [Completed]
It is hypothesized that PF-05212377 (SAM-760) will reverse scopolamine induced cognitive impairments in healthy adults subjects.

The Use of EEG in Alzheimer's Disease, With and Without Scopolamine - A Pilot Study [Completed]
The objective of this study is to compare the electroencephalography (EEG) responses of three distinct groups of individuals to scopolamine: 1) a group of Alzheimer Dementia (AD) patients, 2) a group of individuals suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and 3) a group of controls. The main purpose of this comparison is to discover ways to use these responses to distinguish between the group of AD patients and controls in order to develop a diagnostic tool for AD. The purpose of including the MCI group is to investigate whether this diagnostic tool can predict which member of the MCI group will develop AD later in life.

Comparison of Oral Aprepitant and Transdermal Scopolamine for Preventing Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting [Completed]
Recent evidence suggests multiple drug therapy is superior to single agents. The study compares the incidence of nausea, vomiting, need for rescue medication, prolonged PACU time, and unplanned hospital admission in patients with high risk for PONV treated with oral aprepitant with or without transdermal scopolamine preoperatively.

more trials >>

Reports of Suspected Scopolamine Side Effects

OFF Label USE (20)Vomiting (16)Confusional State (13)Hallucination (13)Abdominal Pain (11)Dyskinesia (10)Pain (10)Nausea (10)DRY Mouth (9)Weight Decreased (8)more >>


Page last updated: 2014-12-01

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