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Podofilox (Podofilox Topical) - Summary

 
 



PODOFILOX SUMMARY

Podofilox is an antimitotic drug which can be chemically synthesized or purified from the plant families Coniferae and Berberidaceae (e. g. species of Juniperus and Podophyllum). Podofilox 0.5% Solution is formulated for topical administration. Each milliliter of solution contains 5 mg of podofilox, in a vehicle containing lactic acid and sodium lactate in alcohol 95%, USP.

Podofilox 0.5% Solution is indicated for the topical treatment of external genital warts (Condyloma acuminatum). This product is not indicated in the treatment of perianal or mucous membrane warts (see PRECAUTIONS).

Diagnosis

Although genital warts have a characteristic appearance, histopathologic confirmation should be obtained if there is any doubt of the diagnosis. Differentiating warts from squamous cell carcinoma (so-called “Bowenoid papulosis”) is of particular concern. Squamous cell carcinoma may also be associated with human papillomavirus but should not be treated with Podofilox 0.5% Solution.


See all Podofilox indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Clinical Trials Related to Podofilox (Podofilox Topical)

Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia [Active, not recruiting]
RATIONALE: Bortezomib and midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving bortezomib and midostaurin together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of bortezomib when given together with midostaurin with or without combination chemotherapy in treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

Bortezomib, Mitoxantrone, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia [Completed]
RATIONALE: Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving bortezomib together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of bortezomib when given together with mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine in treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

Proton Beam Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery [Recruiting]
RATIONALE: Specialized radiation therapy, such as proton beam radiation therapy, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving proton beam radiation therapy together with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells. PURPOSE: This phase I/II trial is studying the side effects and best dose of proton beam radiation therapy when given together with cisplatin and etoposide and to see how well it works in treating patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer that can be removed by surgery.

Busulfan, Etoposide, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Myeloid Cancer [Active, not recruiting]
RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as busulfan and etoposide, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving intensity-modulated radiation therapy together with busulfan and etoposide before a transplant may stop this from happening. PURPOSE: This phase I/II trial is studying the side effects and best dose of intensity-modulated radiation therapy when given together with busulfan and etoposide followed by a donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with advanced myeloid cancer.

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Liposome and Rituximab With Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Burkitt's Lymphoma or Burkitt-Like Lymphoma [Active, not recruiting]
RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Giving rituximab together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome and rituximab together with combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed Burkitt's lymphoma or Burkitt-like lymphoma.

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Page last updated: 2011-08-29

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