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Panhematin (Hemin) - Summary

 
 



PANHEMATIN SUMMARY

PANHEMATIN (hemin for injection) is an enzyme inhibitor derived from processed red blood cells. Hemin for injection was known previously as hematin. The term hematin has been used to describe the chemical reaction product of hemin and sodium carbonate solution. Hemin is an iron containing metalloporphyrin.

PANHEMATIN (hemin for injection) is indicated for the amelioration of recurrent attacks of acute intermittent porphyria temporally related to the menstrual cycle in susceptible women.

Manifestations such as pain, hypertension, tachycardia, abnormal mental status and mild to progressive neurologic signs may be controlled in selected patients with this disorder.

Similar findings have been reported in other patients with acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria variegata and hereditary coproporphyria. PANHEMATIN is not indicated in porphyria cutanea tarda.


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Panhematin (Hemin)

Activated microglia are less vulnerable to hemin toxicity due to nitric oxide-dependent inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK activation. [2011.08.01]
In intracerebral hemorrhage, microglia become rapidly activated and remove the deposited blood and cellular debris. To survive in a harmful hemorrhagic or posthemorrhagic condition, activated microglia must be equipped with appropriate self-defensive mechanism(s) to resist the toxicity of hemin, a component released from damaged RBCs.

Panhematin provides a therapeutic benefit in experimental pancreatitis. [2011.05]
BACKGROUND AND AIM: Acute pancreatitis (AP) can result in pancreatic necrosis and inflammation, with subsequent multi-organ failure. AP is associated with increased neutrophil recruitment and a rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha. Pretreatment with haemin, results in recruitment of haem-oxygenase-1 (HO-1)(+) macrophages and protects against experimental pancreatitis. It is not clear whether modulation of HO-1 after onset of disease has a protective role. In this study, we tested the utility of Panhematin, a water-soluble haemin formulation, in activating and inducing pancreatic HO-1, and as a therapeutic agent in treating mouse acute pancreatitis... CONCLUSIONS: Despite AP-associated mortality and morbidity, no effective treatment other than supportive care exists. We demonstrate that Panhematin leads to: (i) rapid induction and activation of pancreatic HO-1 with recruitment of HO-1(+) cells to the pancreas, (ii) amelioration of AP even when given late during the course of disease, and (iii) a decrease in leucocyte infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines including CXCL1. The utility of Panhematin at modest doses as a therapeutic in experimental pancreatitis, coupled with its current use and safety in humans, raises the potential of its applicability to human pancreatitis.

In vitro selection of a photoresponsive RNA aptamer to hemin. [2010.05.01]
A photoresponsive RNA aptamer to hemin was selected in vitro from a random sequence library of RNAs with azobenzene residues. The aptamer bound to hemin under visible light irradiation and was released by ultraviolet light.

Sulforaphane protects immature hippocampal neurons against death caused by exposure to hemin or to oxygen and glucose deprivation. [2010.05.01]
Oxidative stress is a mediator of cell death following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and heme toxicity, which can be an important pathogenic factor in acute brain injury. Induced expression of phase II detoxification enzymes through activation of the antioxidant response element (ARE)/Nrf2 pathway has emerged as a promising approach for neuroprotection...

Hemin exerts multiple protective mechanisms and attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. [2010.02]
OBJECTIVE: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by recurrent and severe gastrointestinal inflammation. Activation of inflammatory cells, such as TH17 lymphocytes, and/or deficiency of regulatory T cells (Treg) are responsible for the pathogenesis of IBD. As an acute phase reactant, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been shown to play an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory role in many disease processes. In this study, we used a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis model to investigate the effect of upregulating HO-1 by hemin on the development of colonic inflammation... CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that upregulation of HO-1 by hemin ameliorated experimental colitis. Moreover, our study suggests a broader protective mechanism of hemin.

more studies >>

Clinical Trials Related to Panhematin (Hemin)

A Pilot Study of Hemin Therapy for Gastroparesis (Diabetes Mellitus) [Recruiting]
This study is designed to learn if hemin can increase the production of heme oxygenase 1 and improve gastric (stomach) emptying and symptoms in patients with slow gastric emptying (gastroparesis).

Phase 2, Open-Label, Multi-Dose Study of Panhematin in Patients With MDS [Recruiting]
This is a Phase II, open-label clinical trial examining the role of Panhematin® in patients with MDS. The objective of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Panhematin® (hematin for injection) in the treatment of adult patients (≥ 18 years of age) with low-risk MDS.

The study will be conducted on an outpatient basis and will consist of the following:

- A Screening Period (within 28 days of the Day 1)

- Screening bone marrow aspiration and biopsy up to 60 days prior to receiving study

medication

- An 8-week Treatment Period (Days 1 through 4 of Week 1, and weekly visits during Weeks 2

through 8); partial and complete responders in any of the three cell lines may continue treatment for an additional 4 weeks

- A 6-month Post treatment Follow-up Period (monthly clinic visits during Weeks 12 40)

Induction of HO-1; a Therapeutic Approach to Reduce IRI Following Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation [Recruiting]
This is a blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial looking at the effects of Heme arginate (HA) on cadaveric renal transplantation. The investigators know that HA can upregulate HO-1, which has been shown to have a protective effect on animal transplants.

The investigators will be giving HA/placebo to participants prior to transplant and repeat again on day 2 post-transplant and compare outcomes.

A New Treatment Option for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding [Not yet recruiting]
Women with measured menstrual bleeding >80ml per cycle and no contraindications to combined oral contraceptive use will be assigned to an oestradiol/nomegestrol acetate oral contraceptive for 3 cycles during which they will collect all menstrual blood and send all used sanitary protection to the laboratory at the University of Sydney for estimation of blood loss by the alkaline haematin method.

Hypothesis:

An E2/NOMAC combined pill will be effective in controlling HMB in the majority of women without structural pelvic pathology.

Main outcome:

The primary efficacy end-point will be the proportion of women with a reduction of menstrual blood loss ≥ 50% from baseline.

Protocol for the Determination of Menstrual Losses in Healthy Women With Apparently Normal Cycles [Recruiting]
Multicenter, observational, cross-over study intended to apply an easy and simple system for the quantitative determination of menstrual losses in women with apparently normal menses. The system adopted for the determination of menstrual losses, called QUEM (QUantitative Evaluation of Menses), is based on the collection of tampons and pads in standard bags which are readily vacuum sealed with a simple device for the whole of woman's period. The evaluation will be performed for the whole of one period and the analysis will

be performed in comparison to the classical reference method, the Alkaline - Hematin Method,

which is still considered the golden standard.

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Page last updated: 2011-12-09

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