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Lyrica (Pregabalin) - Drug Interactions, Contraindications, Overdosage, etc

 
 



DRUG INTERACTIONS

Since LYRICA is predominantly excreted unchanged in the urine, undergoes negligible metabolism in humans (<2% of a dose recovered in urine as metabolites), and does not bind to plasma proteins, its pharmacokinetics are unlikely to be affected by other agents through metabolic interactions or protein binding displacement. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that LYRICA is unlikely to be involved in significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Specifically, there are no pharmacokinetic interactions between pregabalin and the following antiepileptic drugs: carbamazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, and topiramate. Important pharmacokinetic interactions would also not be expected to occur between LYRICA and commonly used antiepileptic drugs [see Clinical Pharmacology].

Pharmacodynamics

Multiple oral doses of LYRICA were co-administered with oxycodone, lorazepam, or ethanol. Although no pharmacokinetic interactions were seen, additive effects on cognitive and gross motor functioning were seen when LYRICA was co-administered with these drugs. No clinically important effects on respiration were seen.

OVERDOSAGE

Signs, Symptoms and Laboratory Findings of Acute Overdosage in Humans

There is limited experience with overdose of LYRICA. The highest reported accidental overdose of LYRICA during the clinical development program was 8000 mg, and there were no notable clinical consequences. In clinical studies, some patients took as much as 2400 mg/day. The types of adverse reactions experienced by patients exposed to higher doses (≥900 mg) were not clinically different from those of patients administered recommended doses of LYRICA.

Treatment or Management of Overdose

There is no specific antidote for overdose with LYRICA. If indicated, elimination of unabsorbed drug may be attempted by emesis or gastric lavage; usual precautions should be observed to maintain the airway. General supportive care of the patient is indicated including monitoring of vital signs and observation of the clinical status of the patient. A Certified Poison Control Center should be contacted for up-to-date information on the management of overdose with LYRICA.

Although hemodialysis has not been performed in the few known cases of overdose, it may be indicated by the patient's clinical state or in patients with significant renal impairment. Standard hemodialysis procedures result in significant clearance of pregabalin (approximately 50% in 4 hours).

CONTRAINDICATIONS

LYRICA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to pregabalin or any of its other components.

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

Controlled Substance

LYRICA is a Schedule V controlled substance.

LYRICA is not known to be active at receptor sites associated with drugs of abuse. As with any CNS active drug, physicians should carefully evaluate patients for history of drug abuse and observe them for signs of LYRICA misuse or abuse (e.g., development of tolerance, dose escalation, drug-seeking behavior).

Abuse

In a study of recreational users (N=15) of sedative/hypnotic drugs, including alcohol, LYRICA (450mg, single dose) received subjective ratings of "good drug effect,""high" and "liking" to a degree that was similar to diazepam (30mg, single dose). In controlled clinical studies in over 5500 patients, 4 % of LYRICA-treated patients and 1 % of placebo-treated patients overall reported euphoria as an adverse reaction, though in some patient populations studied, this reporting rate was higher and ranged from 1 to 12%.

Dependence

In clinical studies, following abrupt or rapid discontinuation of LYRICA, some patients reported symptoms including insomnia, nausea, headache or diarrhea [see Warnings and Precautions], suggestive of physical dependence.

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