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Lotronex (Alosetron Hydrochloride) - Warnings and Precautions

 
 



WARNING: SERIOUS GASTROINTESTINAL ADVERSE REACTIONS

Infrequent but serious gastrointestinal adverse reactions have been reported with the use of LOTRONEX. These events, including ischemic colitis and serious complications of constipation, have resulted in hospitalization, and rarely, blood transfusion, surgery, and death.

  • The Prescribing Program for LOTRONEX was implemented to help reduce risks of serious gastrointestinal adverse reactions. Only prescribers who have enrolled in the Prometheus Prescribing Program for LOTRONEX, based on their understanding of the benefits and risks, should prescribe LOTRONEX [see Warnings and Precautions ].
  • LOTRONEX is indicated only for women with severe diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who have not responded adequately to conventional therapy [see Indications and Usage (1)] . Before receiving the initial prescription for LOTRONEX, the patient must read and sign the Patient Acknowledgement Form for LOTRONEX [see Patient Counseling Information ].
  • LOTRONEX should be discontinued immediately in patients who develop constipation or symptoms of ischemic colitis. Patients should immediately report constipation or symptoms of ischemic colitis to their prescriber. LOTRONEX should not be resumed in patients who develop ischemic colitis. Patients who have constipation should immediately contact their prescriber if the constipation does not resolve after LOTRONEX is discontinued. Patients with resolved constipation should resume LOTRONEX only on the advice of their treating prescriber [see Dosage and Administration (2.1), Warnings and Precautions (5.1), (5.2)].
 

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Serious Complications of Constipation

Some patients have experienced serious complications of constipation without warning.

Serious complications of constipation, including obstruction, ileus, impaction, toxic megacolon, and secondary bowel ischemia, have been reported with use of LOTRONEX during clinical trials. Complications of constipation have been reported with use of 1 mg twice daily and with lower doses. A dose response relationship has not been established for serious complications of constipation. The incidence of serious complications of constipation was approximately 0.1% (1 per 1,000 patients) in women receiving either LOTRONEX or placebo. In addition, rare cases of perforation and death have been reported from postmarketing clinical practice. In some cases, complications of constipation required intestinal surgery, including colectomy. Patients who are elderly, debilitated, or taking additional medications that decrease gastrointestinal motility may be at greater risk for complications of constipation.

LOTRONEX should be discontinued immediately in patients who develop constipation [see Boxed Warning ].

Ischemic Colitis

Some patients have experienced ischemic colitis without warning.

Ischemic colitis has been reported in patients receiving LOTRONEX in clinical trials as well as during marketed use of the drug. In IBS clinical trials, the cumulative incidence of ischemic colitis in women receiving LOTRONEX was 0.2% (2 per 1,000 patients, 95% confidence interval 1 to 3) through 3 months and was 0.3% (3 per 1,000 patients, 95% confidence interval 1 to 4) through 6 months. Ischemic colitis has been reported with use of 1 mg twice daily and with lower doses. A dose-response relationship has not been established. Ischemic colitis was reported in one patient receiving placebo. The patient experience in controlled clinical trials is insufficient to estimate the incidence of ischemic colitis in patients taking LOTRONEX for longer than 6 months.

LOTRONEX should be discontinued immediately in patients with signs of ischemic colitis such as rectal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, or new or worsening abdominal pain. Because ischemic colitis can be life-threatening, patients with signs or symptoms of ischemic colitis should be evaluated promptly and have appropriate diagnostic testing performed. Treatment with LOTRONEX should not be resumed in patients who develop ischemic colitis.

Prescribing Program for LOTRONEX

To prescribe LOTRONEX, the prescriber must be enrolled in the Prescribing Program for LOTRONEX. To enroll, prescribers must understand the benefits and risks of treatment with LOTRONEX for severe diarrhea-predominant IBS, including the information in the Prescribing Information, Medication Guide, and Patient Acknowledgement Form for LOTRONEX.

To enroll in the Prescribing Program for LOTRONEX, call 1-888-423-5227 or visit www.lotronexppl.com to complete the Prescriber Enrollment Form.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects: Pregnancy Category B. Reproduction studies have been performed in rats at doses up to 40 mg/kg/day (about 160 times the recommended human dose based on body surface area) and rabbits at oral doses up to 30 mg/kg/day (about 240 times the recommended daily human dose based on body surface area). These studies have revealed no evidence of impaired fertility or harm to the fetus due to alosetron. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, LOTRONEX should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

Nursing Mothers

Alosetron and/or metabolites of alosetron are excreted in the breast milk of lactating rats. It is not known whether alosetron is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when LOTRONEX is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established. Use of LOTRONEX is not recommended in the pediatric population, based upon the risk of serious complications of constipation and ischemic colitis in adults.

Geriatric Use

In some studies in healthy men or women, plasma concentrations were elevated by approximately 40% in individuals 65 years and older compared to young adults [see Warnings and Precautions ]. However, this effect was not consistently observed in men.

Postmarketing experience suggests that elderly patients may be at greater risk for complications of constipation therefore, appropriate caution and follow-up should be exercised if LOTRONEX is prescribed for these patients [see Warnings and Precautions].

Hepatic Impairment

Due to the extensive hepatic metabolism of alosetron, increased exposure to alosetron and/or its metabolites is likely to occur in patients with hepatic impairment. Alosetron should not be used in patients with severe hepatic impairment and should be used with caution in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment.

A single 1 mg oral dose of alosetron was administered to 1 female and 5 male patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score of 7 to 9) and to 1 female and 2 male patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score of >9). In comparison with historical data from healthy subjects, patients with severe hepatic impairment displayed higher systemic exposure to alosetron. The female with severe hepatic impairment displayed approximately 14-fold higher exposure, while the female with moderate hepatic impairment displayed approximately 1.6-fold higher exposure, than healthy females. Due to the small number of subjects and high intersubject variability in the pharmacokinetic findings, no definitive quantitative conclusions can be made. However, due to the greater exposure to alosetron in the female with severe hepatic impairment, alosetron should not be used in females with severe hepatic impairment [see Dosage and Administration Contraindications (4)].

Renal Impairment

Renal impairment (creatinine clearance 4 to 56 mL/min) has no effect on the renal elimination of alosetron due to the minor contribution of this pathway to elimination. The effect of renal impairment on metabolite pharmacokinetics and the effect of end-stage renal disease have not been assessed.

Page last updated: 2014-03-31

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