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Lidocaine and Prilocaine (Lidocaine / Prilocaine Topical) - Summary

 
 



SUMMARY

LIDOCAINE and PRILOCAINE CREAM, 2.5%/2.5%

Lidocaine and prilocaine cream, 2.5%/2.5% is an emulsion in which the oil phase is a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine in a ratio of 1:1 by weight. This eutectic mixture has a melting point below room temperature and therefore both local anesthetics exist as a liquid oil rather than as crystals. It is packaged in 30 gram tubes and 5 gram tubes for hospital use.

Lidocaine and prilocaine cream, 2.5%/2.5% (a eutectic mixture of lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5%) is indicated as a topical anesthetic for use on:

  •   - normal intact skin for local analgesia.
  •  - genital mucous membranes for superficial minor surgery and as pretreatment for infiltration anesthesia. Lidocaine and prilocaine cream, 2.5%/2.5% is not recommended in any clinical situation in which penetration or migration beyond the tympanic membrane into the middle ear is possible because of the ototoxic effects observed in animal studies (see WARNINGS).

See all Lidocaine and Prilocaine indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Media Articles Related to Lidocaine and Prilocaine (Lidocaine / Prilocaine Topical)

Stimulating a specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia
Source: Neurology / Neuroscience News From Medical News Today [2014.07.24]
Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works.

Study finds low hand hygiene compliance rates during anesthesia administration
Source: Pain / Anesthetics News From Medical News Today [2014.07.02]
Anesthesia providers are missing opportunities to clean their hands during surgical procedures, according to a study published in the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication...

Use of regional anesthesia during hip fracture surgery not associated with lower risk of death
Source: Pain / Anesthetics News From Medical News Today [2014.06.24]
Among more than 56,000 adults undergoing hip repair between 2004 and 2011, the use of regional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia was not associated with a lower risk of death at 30 days...

Anesthesia May Harm Children's Brains
Source: MedicineNet Ear Tubes Specialty [2012.08.20]
Title: Anesthesia May Harm Children's Brains
Category: Health News
Created: 8/20/2012 11:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 8/20/2012 12:00:00 AM

Hydroxyethyl starch in resuscitation fluid has direct harmful effects on kidney cells
Source: Urology / Nephrology News From Medical News Today [2014.07.14]
The increased risk of kidney injury related to the use of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in resuscitation fluids reflects the mass of HES molecules, according to a report in Anesthesia & Analgesia...

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Published Studies Related to Lidocaine and Prilocaine (Lidocaine / Prilocaine Topical)

Local anesthetic effects of Lidocaine cream: randomized controlled trial using a standardized prick pain. [2011.07.31]
Abstract Background: ELA-max (4% Lidocaine) and EMLA cream (Lidocaine-Prilocaine 2.5%) are topicals used for superficial anesthesia. Only few studies have been published on their comparative effectiveness in close-to-practice pain models.

Management of pain associated with debridement of leg ulcers: a randomized, multicentre, pilot study comparing nitrous oxide-oxygen mixture inhalation and lidocaine-prilocaine cream. [2011.02]
BACKGROUND: Mechanical debridement of fibrin and/or necrosis promotes healing of arterial and venous leg ulcers but is limited by pain associated with the procedure. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to compare the respective analgesic effect of nitrous oxide oxygen mixture (NOOM) inhalation and lidocaine-prilocaine cream (LPC) application during the mechanical repeated debridement of chronic arterial and venous leg ulcers... CONCLUSION: This pilot study demonstrates the superiority of the LPC over NOOM for pain control during the mechanical debridement of chronic leg ulcers. (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (c) 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

Lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster: in minor dermatological and needle puncture procedures. [2010.11.12]
The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster comprises a lidocaine/tetracaine 70 mg/70 mg patch and a controlled heat-assisted drug delivery pod that increases the diffusion of lidocaine and tetracaine into the dermis. Following a 1-hour application period, systemic absorption of lidocaine or tetracaine from the plaster was minimal...

The Effects of Combination Perianal-Intrarectal Lidocaine-Prilocaine Cream and Periprostatic Nerve Block for Pain Control during Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. [2010.07]
PURPOSE: Prostate biopsy for diagnosing cancer can be painful. The efficacy and safety of combination perianal-intrarectal lidocaine-prilocaine (PILP) cream and periprostatic nerve block were compared with nerve block alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx)... CONCLUSIONS: A combination of PILP cream and periprostatic nerve block reduced pain compared to the periprostatic nerve block alone. This safe, simple technique can be considered prior to TRUS-Bx to reduce patient discomfort.

Lidocaine spray administration during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy modified the discomfort and pain of the procedure: results of a randomized clinical trial. [2010.06]
OBJECTIVES: We report the results of a study about the possible benefit of lidocaine spray perineal administration before transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate. Many patients frequently report some kind of discomfort and (or) pain during this procedure, that when pain is severe, may be necessary to interrupt... CONCLUSIONS: Pain score results showed that the use of intrarectal lidocaine spray provided significantly better pain control than cream and anaesthetic gel. Our pain score data suggests that lidocaine spray provides efficient patient comfort during prostate biopsy by reducing pain both during probe insertion and insertion of the needle through the prostate gland. The use of lidocaine spray makes an excellent alternative, causing a reduction of anal sphincter tone with better patient compliance and tolerability to the ultrasound probe during biopsies with an optimization in terms of cost-effectiveness of the procedure.

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Clinical Trials Related to Lidocaine and Prilocaine (Lidocaine / Prilocaine Topical)

Comparison of the Total Dose and Efficacy of Two Lidocaine Concentrations Needed for Cutaneous Surgery Local Anesthesia [Completed]
The purpose of the study will be to demonstrate whether Mohs micrographic surgery can be performed with a lower total dose of local anesthesia (and greater patient safety) when using 0. 5% lidocaine with 1: 200,000 epinephrine versus 1% lidocaine with 1: 100,000 epinephrine.

Preemptive Analgesia for Postlaminectomy [Completed]
To relieve post laminectomy pain, we have tried intraoperative perineural injection of lidocaine right after the exposure in expecting that this would be preemptive analgesia by blocking the nerve transmission so that postoperative pain starts later and lighter.

Lidocaine Lubricant in Pediatric Urethral Catheterization [Completed]
In Emergency Departments (ED) across the nation there is renewed interest in finding ways to alleviate the pain and discomfort associated with many of the procedures that children must undergo. In a policy by the American Academy of Pediatrics, a nationally recognized advocate for children, physicians are urged to advocate for child-specific research in pain management and the effective use of pain medication to ensure compassionate and competent management of pain. (AAP Statement, 2001) Pediatric urethral catheterizations are one such procedure in which children experience significant pain.(11) In present care, children over 2 months of age do not routinely receive intervention for urethral catheterization related anxiety and pain, and, anecdotal reports suggest that most require physical restraint to complete the procedure. Lidocaine is an anesthetic agent that provides relief from pain during many commonly performed ED procedures. Intraurethral Lidocaine has been shown to decrease pain associated with urethral catheter placement in cystograms, however, Lidocaine is not routinely used for urethral catheterizations in the CHOA ED.

This study aims to investigate the potential use of Lidocaine as an anesthetic agent during urethral catheterization of children. Recently, two specific studies were performed investigating the use of Lidocaine to decrease discomfort associated with urethral catheterization. Using the strengths of both previously published studies, our study will use Lidocaine both topically and instilled into the urethra. Investigators plan to perform a prospective three-arm double-blinded randomized clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of Lidocaine jelly as a analgesic when used as a lubricant for urinary catheterization. Investigators aim to demonstrate that Lidocaine used as a lubricant anesthetic for urethral catheterization will provide a safe, time-efficient, and relatively easy way to decrease pediatric pain in the emergency department setting.

Efficacy and Safety Study of Lidocaine Vaginal Gel for Recurrent Dysmenorrhea (Painful Periods) [Active, not recruiting]
The purpose of this study is to determine whether lidocaine vaginal gel is safe and effective for preventing or reducing the severity of dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual periods) compared to placebo (inactive gel).

Lidocaine Supplement for Minimal Invasive Parathyroid Surgery [Completed]
Primary Objective:

1. To determine if the application of lidocaine to the airway will obtund or abolish the laryngeal reflexes. This in turn will lead to a quiescent controlled surgical field.

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Page last updated: 2014-07-24

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