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Librium (Chlordiazepoxide Hydrochloride) - Summary

 
 



LIBRIUM SUMMARY

LIBRIUM® C-IV
(chlordiazepoxide HCl)
CAPSULES

Librium, the original chlordiazepoxide HCl and prototype for the benzodiazepine compounds, was synthesized and developed at Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. It is a versatile therapeutic agent of proven value for the relief of anxiety. Librium is among the safer of the effective psychopharmacologic compounds available, as demonstrated by extensive clinical evidence.

Librium is indicated for the management of anxiety disorders or for the short term relief of symptoms of anxiety, withdrawal symptoms of acute alcoholism, and preoperative apprehension and anxiety. Anxiety or tension associated with the stress of everyday life usually does not require treatment with an anxiolytic.

The effectiveness of Librium in long-term use, that is, more than 4 months, has not been assessed by systematic clinical studies. The physician should periodically reassess the usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Librium (Chlordiazepoxide)

A randomized, double-blind comparison of lorazepam and chlordiazepoxide in patients with uncomplicated alcohol withdrawal. [2009.05]
CONCLUSIONS: With the treatment schedule used in this study, lorazepam is as effective as the more traditional drug chlordiazepoxide in attenuating uncomplicated alcohol withdrawal. Lorazepam, therefore, could be used with confidence when liver disease or the inability to determine liver function status renders chlordiazepoxide therapy problematic. The absence of clinically significant withdrawal complications with lorazepam in this large study contrasts with findings from previously published studies and suggests that higher doses of lorazepam than those formerly used may be necessary during alcohol withdrawal.

A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial of lofexidine in alcohol withdrawal: lofexidine is not a useful adjunct to chlordiazepoxide. [2001.09]
Lofexidine is an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist which has proved useful in opiate withdrawal and which, through its attenuation of noradrenergic activity, might be a valuable adjunct in the management of alcohol withdrawal. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and patient retention with adjunctive lofexidine versus placebo in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal under chlordiazepoxide cover...

The comparison of the effects of multi and single doses of buspirone, chlordiazepoxide and hydroxyzine on psychomotor function and EEG. [1992]
This study compares the effects of buspirone (5 mg), chlordiazepoxide (5 mg), hydroxyzine (10 mg) and placebo on psychomotor function and EEG, when taken thrice daily for a period of two weeks, with those after a single dose administration... Spectral analysis of the EEG did not distinguish between the multi and single dosage schedules regarding the respective drugs in the low doses administered.

Transdermal clonidine versus chlordiazepoxide in alcohol withdrawal: a randomized, controlled clinical trial. [1991.03]
In a prospective, double-blind comparison, we assessed the efficacy of transdermal clonidine with that of chlordiazepoxide in the treatment of moderately severe acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome. While having significant withdrawal symptoms, 50 hospitalized men were randomly assigned to receive either transdermal clonidine or chlordiazepoxide over a 4-day study period.

Chlordiazepoxide vs. methadone in opiate withdrawal: a preliminary double blind trial. [1989.01]
A double blind trial of chlordiazepoxide vs. methadone in the management of the opiate withdrawal syndrome was conducted in a group of 24 regular heroin takers...

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Clinical Trials Related to Librium (Chlordiazepoxide)

Pioglitazone as an Adjunct for Moderate to Severe Depressive Disorder [Recruiting]
The purpose of this study is to determine whether Pioglitazone as an adjunct to Citalopram is effective in treatment of moderate to severe depression

A Study of the Use of Combination of Anti-cholinergic and Minor Tranquilliser in the Treatment of Non-cardiac Chest Pain - a Double Blind Placebo Controlled Study [Recruiting]
Non-cardiac chest pain is a common clinical problem encountered in our practice but at present, the results of treatments are unsatisfactory. The pathogenesis remains unknown but altered motility of the esophagus and psychological factors including anxiety have been implicated as important factors. Reports of the single use of anticholinergic drugs and anxiolytics have yielded conflicting results, has been demonstrated to yield marginal or of no value. However the use of the combination therapy, especially with a double blind fashion have not been reported. On that basis, we propose to use a combination of anti-cholinergic and tranquilliser for the symptomatic treatment of non-cardiac chest pain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapy of anti-cholinergic and anxiolytic drugs in the treatment of non-cardiac chest pain.

Outpatient Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome [Active, not recruiting]
The purpose of this study is to compare a fixed-schedule therapy versus a symptom-triggered therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in medical outpatients.

Objectives:

- Self-governance in monitoring AWS (alcohol withdrawal syndrome) symptoms and medication

- Clinically controlled trial of two regimens for medical treatment of alcohol withdrawal

syndrome

- Outpatient treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome

Alcohol Detoxification in Primary Care Treatment (ADEPT) [Recruiting]
Once someone becomes dependent on alcohol (alcoholic), the risks of complications from alcohol withdrawal when they stop drinking grow. These can include a life‚ąíthreatening fit or delirium tremens (see things, become frightened). To prevent such complications, people take medication such as benzodiazepines (e. g., valium or librium) in reducing doses for about a week; this is called detoxification or 'detox.' In the UK effective alcohol treatment exists but little is known about what is the best detox medication. Alternative drugs to benzodiazepines appear to protect the brain from the toxicity of alcohol withdrawal and to reduce the likelihood of drinking again. This study will examine the feasibility of comparing medication regimens for alcohol detox for the first time in primary care. It will include a standard detox regimen (librium over 8 days) alone and together with a drug, acamprosate, that has been shown to reduce toxicity of alcohol withdrawal in preclinical models and is used after detox to help people remain sober. It will focus on the practicalities of doing such a study as well as assessing how people feel (withdrawal symptoms) and do (drinking during first month).

Local Anesthesia for Prostate Biopsy [Completed]
Title: Local anesthesia for office biopsy of the prostate: effects on pain control, quality of life and surgical intervention. Introduction: Local anesthetic should be administered prior to transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate to control pain in the office setting. Various centers have injected anesthetic in different regions in and around the prostate prior to biopsy. Patient experience with each technique has varied. We would like to determine which procedure provides the best pain control. In addition, we would like to know if the anesthetic placement has any effect on urinary patterns, bowel habits, and sexual function. Furthermore, for those patients found to have cancer and elect surgical treatment, we plan to evaluate if the anesthetic had an impact on surgical dissection of their prostate. Methods: We plan to identify those patients who require prostate biopsy for diagnosis. Each patient will be randomly assigned to a different anesthetic injection group. During the biopsy protocol, our nurse will monitor the patient?s pain level according to the visual analog score. The patient will complete a pre-biopsy questionnaire and two post-biopsy questionnaires administered at 1 and 4 weeks after biopsy. He will receive results of the prostate biopsy pathology report within 48 hours by calling his primary referral service. Results: Analyses of patient?s pain scores and surveys will be conducted by our urologic research statisticians. Conclusions: We plan to determine which location of anesthetic injection provides the best pain relief. We will also understand if this correlated with any adverse outcomes on patient voiding patterns, bowel habits and sexual activity. In the future, we will determine if this had any negative impact on surgical management of prostate cancer.

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Page last updated: 2009-10-20

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