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Klotrix (Potassium Chloride) - Summary

 
 



KLOTRIX SUMMARY

KLOTRIX®
Potassium Chloride
Slow-Release Tablets
10 mEq (750 mg)

Klotrix® (potassium chloride) is a solid, oral dosage form of potassium chloride containing 750 mg of potassium chloride, USP (equivalent to 10 mEq of potassium) in a film-coated wax-matrix tablet. This formulation is intended to provide a controlled release of potassium from the matrix to minimize the likelihood of producing high, localized concentrations of potassium within the gastrointestinal tract. Klotrix is an electrolyte replenisher.

BECAUSE OF REPORTS OF INTESTINAL AND GASTRIC ULCERATION AND BLEEDING WITH CONTROLLED-RELEASE POTASSIUM CHLORIDE PREPARATIONS, THESE DRUGS SHOULD BE RESERVED FOR THOSE PATIENTS WHO CANNOT TOLERATE OR REFUSE TO TAKE LIQUIDS OR EFFERVESCENT POTASSIUM PREPARATIONS OR FOR PATIENTS IN WHOM THERE IS A PROBLEM OF COMPLIANCE WITH THESE PREPARATIONS.

  1. For the treatment of patients with hypokalemia with or without metabolic alkalosis; in digitalis intoxication; and in patients with hypokalemic familial periodic paralysis. If hypokalemia is the result of diuretic therapy, consideration should be given to the use of a lower dose of diuretic, which may be sufficient without leading to hypokalemia.
  2. For prevention of hypokalemia in patients who would be at particular risk if hypokalemia were to develop, e.g., digitalized patients or patients with significant cardiac arrhythmias.

The use of potassium salts in patients receiving diuretics for uncomplicated essential hypertension is often unnecessary when such patients have a normal dietary pattern and when low doses of the diuretic are used. Serum potassium should be checked periodically, however; and, if hypokalemia occurs, dietary supplementation with potassium-containing foods may be adequate to control milder cases. In more severe cases, and if dose adjustment of the diuretic is ineffective or unwarranted, supplementation with potassium salts may be indicated.


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Klotrix (Potassium Chloride)

Efficacy of a commercial dentifrice containing 2% strontium chloride and 5% potassium nitrate for dentin hypersensitivity: a 3-day clinical study in adults in China. [2012]
silica base without any active ingredient (control dentifrice)... CONCLUSION: In these patients with DH in China, the dentifrice containing 2%

Improving outcome of treatment of kala-azar by supplementation of amphotericin B with physiologic saline and potassium chloride. [2010.11]
Complications of amphotericin B limit its wide application in the treatment of patients with kala-azar. This study was undertaken with an aim to minimize anti-renal complications and severe rigor in course of treatment with this drug... Supplementation of amphotericin B with 500 mL of physiologic saline and 30 mL (60 meq/L) of KCl during treatment could help prevent an increase in serum creatinine levels and severe rigor and would make the treatment of kala-azar with amphotericin B easier.

Comparable clinical outcomes between glucosamine sulfate-potassium chloride and glucosamine sulfate sodium chloride in patients with mild and moderate knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind study. [2010.07]
CONCLUSION: In this short-term randomized comparison, glucosamine sulfate with potassium salt (GS-K) is as effective in pain relief and as safe as glucosamine sulfate with sodium salt (GS-Na) for treatment of mild and moderate degree knee osteoarthritis.

Effects of potassium chloride and potassium bicarbonate on endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone turnover in mild hypertensives. [2010.03]
To determine the effects of potassium supplementation on endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone turnover and to compare potassium chloride with potassium bicarbonate, we carried out a 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial in 42 individuals with untreated mildly raised blood pressure...

Racial differences in potassium homeostasis in response to differences in dietary sodium in girls. [2010.03]
BACKGROUND: Racial differences in the renal disposition of potassium may be related to mechanisms for the greater susceptibility to hypertension in blacks than in whites. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study the racial differences in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and in potassium balance in black and white girls consuming a controlled diet that was low in potassium with 2 amounts of sodium intake (low compared with high)... CONCLUSION: The well-known racial difference in urinary potassium excretion appears to be at least in part due to greater renal retention of potassium in black girls.

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Clinical Trials Related to Klotrix (Potassium Chloride)

Comparison of Two Potassium Targets Within the Normal Range in Intensive Care Patients [Recruiting]
Rationale: It is well known that distinctly abnormal blood potassium values can cause serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias. Although potassium regulation is generally considered important, hardly any research has been done about potassium regulation in intensive care patients. The investigators hypothesize that different potassium target-values, within the as normal accepted range, may have different effects in critically ill patients.

Study design: A prospective trial comparing two different potassium target-values. Potassium will be tightly regulated with the already fully operational GRIP-II computer program.

Study population: 1200 adult patients admitted at the thoracic intensive care unit of the University Medical Center Groningen.

Intervention: Comparison between two variations of standard therapy: potassium target-value of 4. 0 mmol/L versus 4. 5 mmol/L.

Main study parameters/endpoints: The primary endpoint is the incidence of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter from ICU-admission to hospital discharge. Secondary endpoints are serum levels of potassium and the other main electrolytes, renal function and renal potassium excretion, the relation with insulin and glucose, the cumulative fluid balance, (ICU) length of stay and mortality.

Potassium Intake in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease [Recruiting]
Chronic kidney disease is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, and strokes. Potassium lowers blood pressure and may help prevent heart disease and strokes in the general population, but has not been well-studied in people with kidney disease. This study will look at the benefits and safety of two levels of potassium intake in patients with kidney disease. We expect that a higher level of potassium intake safely lowers blood pressure compared to a lower level of potassium intake. We hope that this and other research projects will help us to learn more so that guidelines can be created for potassium intake in patients with chronic kidney disease

The Circadian Rhythm of Potassium and Cystatin C [Recruiting]
The potassium value is important to prevent cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In patients with renal failure, the potassium value is not stable and tends to raise. Until now there are no data available if the potassium value has a circadian rhythm and if there are individual changes from day to day.

Effect of Rapid Transfusion With Fluid Management System (FMS) on Plasma Potassium in Liver Transplantation Recipients [Recruiting]
Rapid infusion of red blood cells is known to result in hyperkalemia in the body. However, potassium concentration in the blood mixture (usually made of RBC, FFP and normal saline) in the reservoir of rapid infusion system and its effect on the plasma potassium change during rapid transfusion are unknown. This study is designed to investigate these changes while massive transfusion is performed during liver transplantation surgery.

Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Potassium Citrate on the Prevention of Nephrocalcinosis in Extreme Premature [Not yet recruiting]

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Page last updated: 2013-02-10

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