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Fetzima (Levomilnacipran Hydrochloride) - Drug Interactions, Contraindications, Overdosage, etc

 
 



DRUG INTERACTIONS

Other than CYP3A4 drug interactions, FETZIMA is predicted, based on in vitro studies, to have a low potential to be involved in clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions.

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

[see Dosage and Administration (2.5, 2.6), Contraindications (4), and Warnings and Precautions ]

Serotonergic Drugs

[see Dosage and Administration (2.5, 2.6), Contraindications (4), and Warnings and Precautions]

Drugs that Interfere with Hemostasis (e.g., NSAIDs, Aspirin, and Warfarin)

Serotonin release by platelets plays an important role in hemostasis. Epidemiological studies of case-control and cohort design have demonstrated an association between use of psychotropic drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. These studies have also shown that concurrent use of an NSAID or aspirin may potentiate this risk of bleeding. Altered anticoagulant effects, including increased bleeding, have been reported when SSRIs and SNRIs are co-administered with warfarin. Patients receiving warfarin therapy should be carefully monitored when FETZIMA is initiated or discontinued [see Warnings and Precautions ].

Potential for Other Drugs to Affect FETZIMA

Dose adjustment is recommended when FETZIMA is co-administered with strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 (e.g. ketoconazole) [see Dosage and Administration]. An in vivo study showed a clinically meaningful increase in levomilnacipran exposure when FETZIMA was co-administered with the CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole (see Figure 1).

No dose adjustment of FETZIMA is needed when co-administered with a CYP3A4 inducer or substrate. In vivo studies showed no clinically meaningful change in levomilnacipran exposure when co-administered with the CYP3A4 inducer carbamazepine or the CYP3A4 substrate alprazolam (see Figure 1).

No dose adjustment of FETZIMA is needed when co-administered with inhibitors of CYP2C8, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2J2, P-glycoprotein, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, or OCT2. In vitro studies suggested that CYP2C8, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2J2 had minimal contributions to metabolism of levomilnacipran. In addition, levomilnacipran is not a substrate of BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, or OCT2 and is a weak substrate of P-gp.

Figure 1 PK Interactions between Levomilnacipran (LVM) and Other Drugs

Potential for FETZIMA to Affect Other Drugs

No dose adjustment of the concomitant medication is recommended when FETZIMA is administered with a substrate of CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, P-gp, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, or OCT2. In vitro studies have shown that levomilnacipran is not an inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, P-gp, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, or OCT2. Concomitant use of FETZIMA with alprazolam or carbamazepine, substrates of CYP3A4, had no significant effect on alprazolam or carbamazepine plasma concentrations (see Figure 1).

Central Nervous System (CNS)-Active Agents

The risk of using FETZIMA in combination with other CNS-active drugs has not been systematically evaluated. Consequently, caution is advised when FETZIMA is prescribed in combination with other CNS-active drugs, including those with a similar mechanism of action.

Alcohol

In an in vitro study, alcohol interacted with the extended-release properties of FETZIMA. If FETZIMA is taken with alcohol, a pronounced accelerated drug release may occur. It is recommended that FETZIMA extended-release capsules not be taken with alcohol.

OVERDOSAGE

Human Experience

There is limited clinical experience with FETZIMA overdose in humans. In clinical studies, cases of ingestions up to 360 mg daily were reported with none being fatal.

Management of Overdose

No specific antidotes for FETZIMA are known. In managing overdose, provide supportive care, including close medical supervision and monitoring, and consider the possibility of multiple drug involvement. In case of an overdose, consult a Certified Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) for up-to-date guidance and advice. The high volume of distribution of levomilnacipran suggests that dialysis will not be effective in reducing levomilnacipran plasma concentrations.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • Hypersensitivity to levomilnacipran, milnacipran HCl or to any excipient in the formulation.
  • The use of MAOIs intended to treat psychiatric disorders with FETZIMA or within 7 days of stopping treatment with FETZIMA is contraindicated because of an increased risk of serotonin syndrome. The use of FETZIMA within 14 days of stopping an MAOI intended to treat psychiatric disorders is also contraindicated [see Dosage and Administration and Warnings and Precautions].
    Starting FETZIMA in a patient who is being treated with MAOIs such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue is also contraindicated because of an increased risk of serotonin syndrome [see Dosage and Administration and Warnings and Precautions].

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

Controlled Substance

FETZIMA is not a controlled substance.

Abuse

FETZIMA has not been systematically studied in animals or humans for its potential for abuse. There was no evidence suggestive of drug-seeking behavior in the clinical studies. It is not possible to predict on the basis of clinical experience the extent to which a CNS active drug will be misused, diverted, and/or abused once marketed. Consequently, physicians should carefully evaluate patients for a history of drug abuse and follow such patients closely, observing them for signs of misuse or abuse of FETZIMA (e.g., development of tolerance or drug-seeking behavior).

Dependence

FETZIMA has not been systematically studied in animals or humans for its potential for dependence.

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