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Erythromycin (Erythromycin Base) - Summary

 
 



ERYTHROMYCIN SUMMARY

ERYTHROMYCIN
Base Filmtab®
(erythromycin tablets, USP)

Erythromycin Base Filmtab (erythromycin tablets, USP) is an antibacterial product containing erythromycin, USP, in a unique, nonenteric film coating for oral administration.

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness ofErythromycin Base Filmtab tablets and other antibacterial drugs, Erythromycin Base Filmtab tablets should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Erythromycin Base Filmtab tablets are indicated in the treatment of infections caused by susceptible strains of the designated microorganisms in the diseases listed below:

Upper respiratory tract infections of mild to moderate degree caused by Streptococcus pyogenes; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Haemophilus influenzae (when used concomitantly with adequate doses of sulfonamides, since many strains of H. influenzae are not susceptible to the erythromycin concentrations ordinarily achieved). (See appropriate sulfonamide labeling for prescribing information.)

Lower respiratory tract infections of mild to moderate severity caused by Streptococcus pyogenes or Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Listeriosis caused by Listeria monocytogenes.

Respiratory tract infections due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Skin and skin structure infections of mild to moderate severity caused by Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus (resistant staphylococci may emerge during treatment).

Pertussis (whooping cough) caused by Bordetella pertussis. Erythromycin is effective in eliminating the organism from the nasopharynx of infected individuals, rendering them noninfectious. Some clinical studies suggest that erythromycin may be helpful in the prophylaxis of pertussis in exposed susceptible individuals.

Diphtheria: Infections due to Corynebacterium diphtheriae, as an adjunct to antitoxin, to prevent establishment of carriers and to eradicate the organism in carriers.

Erythrasma--In the treatment of infections due to Corynebacterium minutissimum.

Intestinal amebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica (oral erythromycins only). Extraenteric amebiasis requires treatment with other agents.

Acute pelvic inflammatory disease caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Erythrocin® Lactobionate-I.V. (erythromycin lactobionate for injection, USP) followed by erythromycin base orally, as an alternative drug in treatment of acute pelvic inflammatory disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae in female patients with a history of sensitivity to penicillin. Patients should have a serologic test for syphilis before receiving erythromycin as treatment of gonorrhea and a follow-up serologic test for syphilis after 3 months.

Erythromycins are indicated for treatment of the following infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis: conjunctivitis of the newborn, pneumonia of infancy, and urogenital infections during pregnancy. When tetracyclines are contraindicated or not tolerated, erythromycin is indicated for the treatment of uncomplicated urethral, endocervical, or rectal infections in adults due to Chlamydia trachomatis.3

When tetracyclines are contraindicated or not tolerated, erythromycin is indicated for the treatment of nongonococcal urethritis caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum.3

Primary syphilis caused by Treponema pallidum. Erythromycin (oral forms only) is an alternative choice of treatment for primary syphilis in patients allergic to the penicillins. In treatment of primary syphilis, spinal fluid should be examined before treatment and as part of the follow-up after therapy.

Legionnaires' Disease caused by Legionella pneumophila. Although no controlled clinical efficacy studies have been conducted, in vitro and limited preliminary clinical data suggest that erythromycin may be effective in treating Legionnaires' Disease.

Prevention of Initial Attacks of Rheumatic Fever--Penicillin is considered by the American Heart Association to be the drug of choice in the prevention of initial attacks of rheumatic fever (treatment of Streptococcus pyogenes infections of the upper respiratory tract e.g., tonsillitis, or pharyngitis).3 Erythromycin is indicated for the treatment of penicillin-allergic patients. The therapeutic dose should be administered for ten days.

Prevention of Recurrent Attacks of Rheumatic Fever--Penicillin or sulfonamides are considered by the American Heart Association to be the drugs of choice in the prevention of recurrent attacks of rheumatic fever. In patients who are allergic to penicillin and sulfonamides, oral erythromycin is recommended by the American Heart Association in the long-term prophylaxis of streptococcal pharyngitis (for the prevention of recurrent attacks of rheumatic fever).3


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Erythromycin

Effect of long-term, low-dose erythromycin on pulmonary exacerbations among patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: the BLESS randomized controlled trial. [2013]
IMPORTANCE: Macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin may improve clinical outcomes in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, although associated risks of macrolide resistance are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and antimicrobial resistance cost of low-dose erythromycin given for 12 months to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis with a history of frequent pulmonary exacerbations...

Randomized double-blind crossover study to determine the effects of erythromycin on small intestinal nutrient absorption and transit in the critically ill. [2012]
on small intestinal nutrient absorption and transit in the critically ill... CONCLUSIONS: Acute administration of erythromycin increases small intestinal

A comparison between the effectiveness of erythromycin, single-dose clarithromycin and topical fusidic acid in the treatment of erythrasma. [2011.09.18]
Abstract Although erythrasma is a superficial skin infection, there is no consensus on the treatment model of erythrasma... Conclusion: Topical fusidic acid proved to be the most effective treatment; however, clarithromycin therapy may be an alternative regimen in the treatment of erythrasma because of its efficiency and better patient's compliance.

[Comparison of maternal and perinatal outcomes in the conservative treatment preterm premature membrane rupture between the use of erythromycin and clindamycin]. [2011.07]
BACKGROUND: premature rupture of membranes occurs between 5 and 15% of pregnancies, of these, 10% occurs at term and preterm 2 to 3.5%. OBJECTIVE: To compare maternal and perinatal outcomes from the use of erythromycin or clindamycin in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes with conservative treatment at the Regional General Hospital No. 36... CONCLUSIONS: comparing the maternal and perinatal outcomes with conservative management of premature rupture of membranes, results were better in the group treated with erythromycin. It is not possible to prove it statistically because of the sample size.

Erythromycin infusion or gastric lavage for upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a multicenter randomized controlled trial. [2011.06]
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The quality of endoscopy depends on the quality of upper gastrointestinal tract preparation. We determine whether in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding the frequency of satisfactory stomach visualization was different after intravenous erythromycin, a nasogastric tube with gastric lavage, or both... CONCLUSION: In acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, administration of intravenous erythromycin provides satisfactory endoscopic conditions, without the need for a nasogastric tube and gastric lavage. Copyright (c) 2011 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Clinical Trials Related to Erythromycin

The Effect of Concomitant Administration of Erythromycin and Diltiazem on CYP3A Activity in Healthy Volunteers [Completed]
We, the researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine, are doing this study to better understand how the effects of certain medications are altered when taken simultaneously, or in combination with each other. We will also look at how each volunteer's genes (DNA) may affect the way these medications are metabolized.

Hypothesis:

We will test the hypothesis that the extent of drug-drug interaction caused by the combination of erythromycin and diltiazem is not predictable from the extent of interaction produced by each inhibitor alone. Specifically we will test the hypothesis that the combination of erythromycin and diltiazem will cause a greater decrease in midazolam intravenous and oral clearance than the sum of the decreases caused by each inhibitor alone.

Methylnaltrexone vs Erythromycin for Facilitating Gastric Emptying Time in Critically Ill Patients [Recruiting]
42 patients admitted in ICU with intolerance to enteral feeding (GRV more than 250 ml) are recruited. All patients enter a primary acetaminophen absorption test study as baseline. Serum levels of acetaminophen will be measured by florescence polarization method at 15,30,45,60,90,120,180,240,480 minutes after enteral administration of 975 mg acetaminophen. Then the patients will be randomized to methylnaltrexone or erythromycin group. Another acetaminophen absorption test with the same schedule will be done after the last dose of each drug. The area under the curve for acetaminophen blood level will be used to compare the effect of two studied drugs on gastric emptying time.

Comparison of Two Macrolides, Azithromycin and Erythromycin, for Symptomatic Treatment of Gastroparesis [Recruiting]
Erythromycin is effectively used in the treatment of Gastroparesis (GP) patients. In susceptible patients however, it has been associated with sudden cardiac death due to prolongation of QT intervals and subsequent cardiac risks through its interaction some other drugs. Azithromycin (AZI) is a macrolide antibiotic but does not have the mentioned druf interactions , has fewer gastrointestinal side effects, and fewer risks of QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmias. Consequently, AZI avoids drawbacks of dosing with erythromycin and may be preferred as a prokinetic agent in patients on other concomitant medications.

We hope to demonstrate the effectiveness of Azithromycin (AZI) as compared to Erythromycin in the treatment of Gastroparesis (GP), and later, form the framework for larger randomized-controlled parallel studies to investigate use of AZI for treatment of GP.

Our novel hypothesis is to determine whether AZI can be used to treat GP.

A Study of Erythromycin and Rivaroxaban in Study Participants With Normal and Reduced Kidney Function [Recruiting]
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rivaroxaban when administered with erythromycin to study participants with mild or moderate renal impairment compared to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rivaroxaban administered to study participants with normal renal function.

An Open, Prospective, Randomized, Multicenter Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Intravenous Followed by Oral Azithromycin Versus Cefuroxime Alone or With Oral Erythromycin for the Treatment of Chinese Patients Who Were Hospitalized for Pneumonia [Completed]
To validate the efficacy and safety of azithromycin for the treatment of Chinese patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), compared with cefuroxime or the combination of cefuroxime plus oral erythromycin.

more trials >>

Reports of Suspected Erythromycin Side Effects

Drug Hypersensitivity (62)Drug Interaction (26)Rash (21)Nausea (19)Toxicity TO Various Agents (19)Maternal Exposure During Pregnancy (18)Dyspnoea (17)Drug Ineffective (16)Sepsis (15)Liver Injury (14)more >>


PATIENT REVIEWS / RATINGS / COMMENTS

Based on a total of 7 ratings/reviews, Erythromycin has an overall score of 4.57. The effectiveness score is 5.71 and the side effect score is 5.71. The scores are on ten point scale: 10 - best, 1 - worst. Below are selected reviews: the highest, the median and the lowest rated.
 

Erythromycin review by 18 year old female patient

  Rating
Overall rating:  
Effectiveness:   Moderately Effective
Side effects:   Severe Side Effects
  
Treatment Info
Condition / reason:   Acne on my back
Dosage & duration:   3x daily (dosage frequency: 3x daily) for the period of Still on it
Other conditions:   Allergic to milk,
Other drugs taken:   Vitamin B-12
  
Reported Results
Benefits:   I started noticing changes on my back
Side effects:   I started having alot of abdominal pain, and the urge to go to the bathroom, I had a bladder infection. I would also get a headache once in awhile
Comments:   I started taking minocycline, although it made me really sick so I then went to this drug

 

Erythromycin review by 55 year old female patient

  Rating
Overall rating:  
Effectiveness:   Marginally Effective
Side effects:   Mild Side Effects
  
Treatment Info
Condition / reason:   acne
Dosage & duration:   400mm (dosage frequency: 3 x day) for the period of one year
Other conditions:   none
Other drugs taken:   none
  
Reported Results
Benefits:   Treatment was for cystic acne. The dermatologist prescribed erythomyicin for treatment. Saw the dermatologist biweekly and the dermatologist would give me a check over. The dermatologist then would ask if I was doing anything different, and then would proceed to give me a new prescription for the erythromycin.
Side effects:   The erthyromycin was prescribed for cystic acne. The erthyromycin is an orally administrated drug for the treatment of bacterial infections. Gastrointestinal disturbances, such as diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain, and vomiting, are fairly common. Although I did not have any vomiting reactions the other disturbances did occur. The treatment with the erthyromycin did not relieve the cystic acne. I was taking the erythromycin three times a day for almost one year and there were no noticeable results.
Comments:   The dermatologist would see me every other week for and check my cystic acne. The medical tech. person would first check me and ask questions regarding any changes in what I was doing and how the medication was working and if there were any side effects. The dermatologist would then come into the room and check my cystic acne. The dermatologist would then ask if I was doing anything different and then would ask if I was taking my medication and ask if I was on any other medications. He wouild ask if there were any bad side effects to the medication and then would give me another prescription for another round of medication treatment. This would go on for about one year of visits and prescriptions. There was not any change in the cystic acne of any great degree.

 

Erythromycin review by 45 year old female patient

  Rating
Overall rating:  
Effectiveness:   Ineffective
Side effects:   Moderate Side Effects
  
Treatment Info
Condition / reason:   bladder infection
Dosage & duration:   do not remember 1 or 2x day (dosage frequency: as prescribed) for the period of 1 day
Other conditions:   none
Other drugs taken:   none
  
Reported Results
Benefits:   none. I only took the prescription for 1 day
Side effects:   My entire body broke out in a red, itchy rash that was not relieved by scratching nor by topical agents. I reported the reaction to the pharmacist and to my doctor, both of whom told me to cease using the antibiotic immediately as continued use in the presence of the adverse reaction could be very dangerous.
Comments:   The erythromicin was changed to amoxycillin, which I used safely and effectively for 5 to seven days and experience complete relief from symptoms of the bladder infection for which I was being treated.

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Page last updated: 2014-11-30

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