DrugLib.com — Drug Information Portal

Rx drug information, pharmaceutical research, clinical trials, news, and more

Equagesic (Meprobamate / Aspirin) - Summary

 
 



EQUAGESIC SUMMARY

General

Each tablet of Equagesic, for oral administration, contains 200 mg meprobamate and 325 mg aspirin.

As an adjunct in the short-term treatment of pain accompanied by tension and/or anxiety in patients with musculoskeletal disease. Clinical trials have demonstrated that in these situations relief of pain is somewhat greater than with aspirin alone.  Equagesic is not intended for use longer than 10 days.


See all Equagesic indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Media Articles Related to Equagesic (Meprobamate / Aspirin)

Many U.S. Workers on Disability Use Narcotic Painkillers, Study Finds
Source: MedicineNet Chronic Pain Specialty [2014.08.22]
Title: Many U.S. Workers on Disability Use Narcotic Painkillers, Study Finds
Category: Health News
Created: 8/22/2014 9:36:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 8/22/2014 12:00:00 AM

U.S. to Tighten Access to Certain Narcotic Painkillers
Source: MedicineNet Drug Abuse Specialty [2014.08.22]
Title: U.S. to Tighten Access to Certain Narcotic Painkillers
Category: Health News
Created: 8/21/2014 4:36:00 PM
Last Editorial Review: 8/22/2014 12:00:00 AM

Treating pain by blocking the 'chili-pepper receptor'
Source: Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today [2014.08.21]
Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others.

IBS - why pain relief drugs don't work
Source: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology News From Medical News Today [2014.08.21]
New research from the University of Adelaide is the first in the world to explain why people with irritable bowel syndrome - also known as IBS - may not get relief from pain medications.

After brachial plexus injury, electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain
Source: Medical Devices / Diagnostics News From Medical News Today [2014.08.21]
Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown.

more news >>


Page last updated: 2014-08-22

-- advertisement -- The American Red Cross
 
Home | About Us | Contact Us | Site usage policy | Privacy policy

All Rights reserved - Copyright DrugLib.com, 2006-2014