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Desoxyn (Methamphetamine Hydrochloride) - Summary

 
 



METHAMPHETAMINE HAS A HIGH POTENTIAL FOR ABUSE. IT SHOULD THUS BE TRIED ONLY IN WEIGHT REDUCTION PROGRAMS FOR PATIENTS IN WHOM ALTERNATIVE THERAPY HAS BEEN INEFFECTIVE. ADMINISTRATION OF METHAMPHETAMINE FOR PROLONGED PERIODS OF TIME IN OBESITY MAY LEAD TO DRUG DEPENDENCE AND MUST BE AVOIDED. PARTICULAR ATTENTION SHOULD BE PAID TO THE POSSIBILITY OF SUBJECTS OBTAINING METHAMPHETAMINE FOR NON-THERAPEUTIC USE OR DISTRIBUTION TO OTHERS, AND THE DRUG SHOULD BE PRESCRIBED OR DISPENSED SPARINGLY. MISUSE OF METHAMPHETAMINE MAY CAUSE SUDDEN DEATH AND SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR ADVERSE EVENTS.

 

DESOXYN SUMMARY

DESOXYNĀ® (methamphetamine hydrochloride tablets, USP), chemically known as (S)-N,α-dimethylbenzeneethanamine hydrochloride, is a member of the amphetamine group of sympathomimetic amines.

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: DESOXYN tablets are indicated as an integral part of a total treatment program which typically includes other remedial measures (psychological, educational, social) for a stabilizing effect in children over 6 years of age with a behavioral syndrome characterized by the following group of developmentally inappropriate symptoms: moderate to severe distractibility, short attention span, hyperactivity, emotional lability, and impulsivity. The diagnosis of this syndrome should not be made with finality when these symptoms are only of comparatively recent origin. Nonlocalizing (soft) neurological signs, learning disability, and abnormal EEG may or may not be present, and a diagnosis of central nervous system dysfunction may or may not be warranted.

Exogenous Obesity: as a short-term (i.e., a few weeks) adjunct in a regimen of weight reduction based on caloric restriction, for patients in whom obesity is refractory to alternative therapy, e.g., repeated diets, group programs, and other drugs.

The limited usefulness of DESOXYN tablets (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY ) should be weighed against possible risks inherent in use of the drug, such as those described below.


See all Desoxyn indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Desoxyn (Methamphetamine)

State dependent effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on methamphetamine craving. [2014]
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate subjective craving ratings in drug dependents by modification of cortical excitability in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Given the mechanism of craving in methamphetamine (meth) users, we aimed to test whether tDCS of DLPFC could also alter self-reported craving in abstinent meth users while being exposed to meth cues...

Cigarette smoking as a target for potentiating outcomes for methamphetamine abuse treatment. [2013]
meaningful pattern... CONCLUSIONS: Initial smoking status did not impact treatment

A retrospective analysis of two randomized trials of bupropion for methamphetamine dependence: suggested guidelines for treatment discontinuation/augmentation. [2012]
BACKGROUND: Two clinical trials have shown efficacy for bupropion in treating methamphetamine (MA) dependence among those with moderate baseline MA use. However, treatment response is highly variable and it is unclear what duration of treatment is necessary to determine if maintaining the treatment course is indicated or if discontinuation or augmentation is appropriate.

Poor response to sertraline in methamphetamine dependence is associated with sustained craving for methamphetamine. [2011.11.01]
CONCLUSIONS: Some MA-abusing individuals treated with SSRIs have sustained craving with an increased propensity to relapse during treatment despite psychosocial treatment interventions. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

Mirtazapine to reduce methamphetamine use: a randomized controlled trial. [2011.11]
CONTEXT: No approved pharmacologic treatments for methamphetamine dependence exist. Methamphetamine use is associated with high morbidity and is a major cofactor in the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether mirtazapine would reduce methamphetamine use among MSM who are actively using methamphetamine... CONCLUSION: The addition of mirtazapine to substance use counseling decreased methamphetamine use among active users and was associated with decreases in sexual risk despite low to moderate medication adherence. Trial Registration clinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00497081.

more studies >>

Clinical Trials Related to Desoxyn (Methamphetamine)

Pilot Study of Entacapone for Methamphetamine Abuse [Recruiting]
Addiction to methamphetamine is a serious health problem. There are no medications that a doctor can give someone to help them stop using methamphetamine. Entacapone (Comtan©) is a medication that could help people addicted to methamphetamine. This study will see how entacapone works in healthy people who are given methamphetamine. We think that the study drug will be well tolerated, and that it will prevent some of the effects of methamphetamine that make it so addictive. We also want to see how differences in people's genes may cause differences in the ways the study drug and methamphetamine work for them. The study has six total visits. The first visit is for screening. Tests and procedures will make sure it is safe for subjects to participate. The second visit is a familiarization day. Subjects will receive methamphetamine, but no entacapone. This is done to make sure they can tolerate the drug and recognize its effects before being given a second drug on the same day. Subjects will take surveys and computer tests to see how the medications change mood, thinking, and liking the drug. The final four visits are the actual study days. Subjects will be randomly assigned (like the flip of a coin) to the different ways to get either 1) study medication or placebo (placebo contains no active study medication) and then 2) methamphetamine or placebo. Subjects will be in all four groups during the study, which means that each day a subject will get a different group.

Characterizing Methamphetamine Withdrawal in Recently Abstinent Methamphetamine Users: A Pilot Study [Completed]
Methamphetamine use has escalated in recent years. Methamphetamine use has also spread throughout the country. Although much information has been gathered on the treatment of cocaine abuse, very little information has been obtained on the treatment of methamphetamine abuse. One of the first steps in developing appropriate treatment is to examine the effects of stopping a particular substance's use on individuals abusing that substance. To date this has not been well studied for people abusing methamphetamine. The purpose of this study is to better understand and develop accurate ways of measuring symptoms associated with stopping the use of methamphetamine in people that are abusing methamphetamine. If the withdrawal symptoms are able to be effectively measured, this will help to develop treatments targeted at alleviating these symptoms. These symptoms are often associated with relapse to use of that substance.

Buspirone as a Candidate Medication for Methamphetamine Abuse [Recruiting]
Methamphetamine use disorders are an unrelenting public health concern. Intensive research efforts have yielded behavioral interventions that reduce methamphetamine use, however, these interventions are not universally effective and treatment effects diminish over time. Development of a pharmacotherapy that enhances the efficacy of these interventions is a priority for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This study proposes to determine the impact of buspirone maintenance on self-administration of methamphetamine. These preliminary data will be used to support further research developing buspirone as a pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine use disorders. The investigators hypothesize that buspirone will attenuate the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine.

Development of a Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Methamphetamine Use [Completed]
The AIMS study compares a methamphetamine-specific treatment intervention to a treatment-as-usual Functional Family Therapy (FFT) approach for adolescents ages 15 to 19. Adolescents are assigned to one of two treatment conditions: (1) 16 weeks of FFT designed to strengthen family relationships and develop skills for helping the adolescent avoid drug use; or (2) 16 weeks of a combination of FFT and a methamphetamine-specific intervention involving group and individual therapy sessions; Families are assessed using questionnaires and interviews, and adolescents participate in neuropsychological testing, before, during, and after treatment to provide information about family functioning, the adolescent's drug use, the adolescent's peers, and other factors that may contribute to treatment success. Adolescents also provide urine specimens for drug screening at assessment visits. Through a partnership with Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), adolescents will participate in functional magnetic resonance imaging appointments at the hospital to examine regional brain blood flow during tasks designed to measure impulsivity and risk-taking behaviors. As a treatment development grant, study investigators will study adolescents' acceptance of and response to the newly developed methamphetamine-specific treatment approach.

Theory-based Text Messaging to Reduce Methamphetamine Use and HIV Risks Among MSM [Recruiting]
Participants receive culturally relevant and specifically tailored text messages based on the behavioral change theoretical constructs of Social Support Theory, Health Belief Model, and Social Cognitive Theory. Participants are randomized into one of three conditions for an 8-week intervention period: Group 1: culturally relevant theory-based text messages interactively transmitted by peer health educators (TXT-PHE); or, Group 2: the same culturally relevant theory-based text messages transmitted by automation (TXT-Auto); or, Group 3: assessment-only (AO) control with no theoretically based text messages. Participants in all three conditions receive brief weekly text-message assessments on their methamphetamine use and HIV sexual behaviors in the previous seven days. Data related to intervention costs as well as relative exposure to each theoretical construct will be examined to determine cost- and mechanism-effectiveness, respectively. The randomized three-group design uses repeated assessments at baseline, at the end of the 8-week intervention period, and at 3-, 6-, and 9-month post randomization follow-up. This study will determine the differential immediate and sustained effects of transmitting theory-based text messages by PHE (TXT-PHE) versus by automation (TXT-Auto), compared to an assessment-only (AO) control condition among out-of-treatment, methamphetamine-using MSM for reductions of methamphetamine use and HIV sexual risk behaviors. It is hypothesized that there will be significantly greater reductions in methamphetamine use and HIV sexual risk behaviors from text messages transmitted by PHE than by text messages transmitted by automation, which in turn will produce significantly greater reductions than the AO condition (PHE > TXT > AO). In addition, this study will determine the cost-effectiveness of TXT-PHE vs. TXT-Auto compared to AO for reducing methamphetamine use and HIV sexual risk behaviors. The investigators hypothesize that the TXT-PHE intervention will prove more cost-effective than TXT-Auto in reducing methamphetamine use and HIV sexual risk behaviors, while the TXT-Auto condition will prove more cost effective than the AO condition in reducing these same outcomes (PHE > TXT > AO).

more trials >>

Reports of Suspected Desoxyn (Methamphetamine) Side Effects

Drug Interaction (15)Toxicity TO Various Agents (15)Cardiac Arrest (12)Respiratory Arrest (11)Intentional Drug Misuse (9)Completed Suicide (8)Drug Abuse (7)Pulmonary Oedema (6)Sudden Death (5)Hypotension (4)more >>


Page last updated: 2015-08-10

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