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Clotrimazole (Clotrimazole Topical) - Warnings and Precautions

 
 



WARNINGS

Clotrimazole cream is not for ophthalmic use.

PRECAUTIONS

General:

If irritation or sensitivity develops with the use of clotrimazole cream, treatment should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

Information for Patients:

The patient should be advised to:

  1. 1.Use the medication for the full treatment time even though the symptoms may have improved. Notify the physician if there is no improvement after four weeks of treatment.
  2. 2.Inform the physician if the area of application shows signs of increased irritation (redness, itching, burning, blistering, swelling, oozing) indicative of possible sensitization.
  3. 3.Avoid the use of occlusive wrappings or dressings.
  4. 4.Avoid sources of infection or reinfection.

Laboratory Tests

If there is lack of response to clotrimazole cream, appropriate microbiological studies should be repeated to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other pathogens before instituting another course of antimycotic therapy.

Drug Interactions

Synergism or antagonism between clotrimazole and nystatin, or amphotericin B, or flucytosine against strains of C. albicans has not been reported.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

An 18-month oral dosing study with clotrimazole in rats has not revealed any carcinogenic effect.

In tests for mutagenesis, chromosomes of the spermatophores of Chinese hamsters which had been exposed to clotrimazole were examined for structural changes during the metaphase. Prior to testing, the hamsters had received five oral clotrimazole doses of 100 mg/kg body weight. The results of this study showed that clotrimazole had no mutagenic effect.

Usage in Pregnancy: Pregnancy Category B

The disposition of 14C-clotrimazole has been studied in humans and animals. Clotrimazole is very poorly absorbed following dermal application or intravaginal administration to humans. (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY)

In clinical trials, use of vaginally applied clotrimazole in pregnant women in their second and third trimesters has not been associated with ill effects. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Studies in pregnant rats with intravaginal doses up to 100 mg/kg have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus due to clotrimazole.

High oral doses of clotrimazole in rats and mice ranging from 50 to 120 mg/kg resulted in embroyotoxicity (possible secondary to maternal toxicity), impairment of mating, decreased litter size and number of viable young and decreased pup survival to weaning. However, clotrimazole was not teratogenic in mice, rabbits and rats at oral doses up to 200, 180 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Oral absorption in the rat amounts to approximately 90% of the administered dose.

Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used only if clearly indicated during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when clotrimazole is used by a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in children have been established for clotrimazole when used as indicated and in the recommended dosage.

Page last updated: 2012-07-01

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