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Bontril PDM (Phendimetrazine Tartrate) - Summary

 
 



BONTRIL PDM SUMMARY

BONTRIL PDM (phendimetrazine tartrate) is a sympathomimetic amine with pharmacological activity similar to the prototype drugs of this class used in obesity, the amphetamines.

Bontril PDM (phendimetrazine tartrate) is indicated in the management of exogenous obesity as a short term adjunct (a few weeks) in a regimen of weight reduction based on caloric restriction. The limited usefulness of agents of this class (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY) should be measured against possible risk factors inherent in their use such as those described below.


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Media Articles Related to Bontril PDM (Phendimetrazine)

Therapies focus on areas of memory and learning in the brain to treat obesity
Source: Neurology / Neuroscience News From Medical News Today [2014.07.26]
Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience.

Ergonomic effects of obesity-related functional performance impairment investigated
Source: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness News From Medical News Today [2014.07.26]
U.S. workplaces may need to consider innovative methods to prevent fatigue from developing in employees who are obese.

Brown fat found to protect against diabetes and obesity
Source: Diabetes News From Medical News Today [2014.07.25]
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shown for the first time that people with higher levels of brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, in their bodies have better...

Obesity linked to low endurance, increased fatigue in the workplace
Source: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness News From Medical News Today [2014.07.25]
Workplaces may need to consider innovative meethods to prevent fatigue from developing in employees who are obese.

Language and Obesity: Putting the Person Before the Disease
Source: Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology Headlines [2014.07.24]
The language that we use for individuals affected by obesity needs to consistently put people before their diseases.
Medscape Public Health

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Published Studies Related to Bontril PDM (Phendimetrazine)

Rare case of rhabdomyolysis with therapeutic doses of phendimetrazine tartrate. [2006.03]
Phendimetrazine tartrate is a newer drug that acts as a central stimulant and indirectly acting sympathomimetic with a host of uses similar to the class amphetamines... Additional awareness is needed to educate their patients about the side effects associated with these drugs and to strongly discourage their unsupervised use.

Acute interstitial nephritis following treatment with anorectic agents phentermine and phendimetrazine. [1998.10]
A 47-year-old mildly obese female began a weight reduction program that included anorectic therapy with phentermine and phendimetrazine. A normal urinalysis and serum creatinine were documented at the start of therapy... This case represents the first report of acute interstitial nephritis associated with phentermine or phendimetrazine.

A simple gas chromatographic identification and determination of 11 CNS stimulants in biological samples. Application on a fatality involving phendimetrazine. [1989.02]
A method is presented for the simultaneous identification and quantification of several CNS stimulants, including amphetamine in plasma and urine by GC/FID using mephentermine as an internal standard.

Fatality from illicit phendimetrazine use. [1988]
Phendimetrazine is an anorectic agent which recently has been detected in three medical examiner's cases. In one instance death was attributed to this drug... In the one instance where death was attributed to this substance, the blood concentration was 300 ng/ml.

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Page last updated: 2014-07-26

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