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Atnaa (Atropine / Pralidoxime Chloride) - Summary

 
 



ATNAA SUMMARY

"ATNAA"
(ANTIDOTE TREATMENT - NERVE AGENT, AUTO-INJECTOR)
ATROPINE INJECTION, 2.1 mg/0.7 mL PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE INJECTION, 600 mg/2 mL

The Antidote Treatment - Nerve Agent, Auto-Injector (ATNAA) provides Atropine Injection and Pralidoxime Chloride Injection in separate chambers as sterile, pyrogen-free solutions for intramuscular injection. The ATNAA is a specially designed unit for automatic self-or buddy-administration by military personnel. When activated, the ATNAA sequentially administers atropine and pralidoxime chloride through a single needle. The recommended procedure (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION) is to inject the contents of the auto-injector into the muscles of an outer thigh or into the buttocks. When activated, each ATNAA dispenses:2.1 mg atropine in 0.7 mL of a sterile, pyrogen-free solution containing 12.47 mg glycerin and not more than 2.8 mg phenol, citrate buffer, and Water for Injection. The pH range is 4.0 - 5.0. And600 mg of pralidoxime chloride in 2 mL of a sterile, pyrogen-free solution containing 40 mg benzyl alcohol, 22.5 mg glycine, and Water for Injection. The pH is adjusted with hydrochloric acid. The pH range is 2.0-3.0. After a ATNAA has been activated, the empty container should be disposed of properly (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). It cannot be refilled, nor can the protruding needle be retracted. Atropine, an anticholinergic agent (muscarinic antagonist), occurs as white crystals, usually needle-like, or as a white, crystalline powder.

The ATNAA is indicated for the treatment of poisoning by susceptible organophosphorous nerve agents having anticholinesterase activity.


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS


Page last updated: 2007-05-17

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