DrugLib.com — Drug Information Portal

Rx drug information, pharmaceutical research, clinical trials, news, and more

Aminohippurate (Aminohippurate Sodium) - Summary

 
 



AMINOHIPPURATE SUMMARY

Aminohippurate sodium* is an agent to measure effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). It is the sodium salt of para-aminohippuric acid, commonly abbreviated "PAH."It is water soluble, lipid-insoluble, and has a pKa of 3.83.

Estimation of effective renal plasma flow.

Measurement of the functional capacity of the renal tubular secretory mechanism.


See all Aminohippurate indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Aminohippurate

Effects of tenoxicam on renal function and the disposition of inulin and p-aminohippurate in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic renal failure. [1991.10]
1. The effects of tenoxicam on renal function were studied in 10 patients with chronic renal failure (creatinine clearance 46.7 +/- 11.9 ml min-1 1.73 m-2) and eight healthy volunteers... The administration of tenoxicam for 10 days was associated with a small but significant increase in the plasma half-life and volume of distribution of inulin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

more studies >>

Clinical Trials Related to Aminohippurate

A Phase 1, Open Label, Placebo-Controlled Study to Evaluate the Effect of GSK1349572 on Iohexol and Para-Aminohippurate Clearance in Healthy Subjects [Completed]
The current study is designed to confirm the mechanism behind the increase in serum creatinine observed during GSK1349572 therapy; specifically, the study will determine whether GSK1349572 has any effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or effective renal plasma flow. Absent such effects, one may conclude that the small increases in serum creatinine observed are due to the inhibition of the tubular secretion of creatinine via organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) consistent with in vitro data. .

Investigation of Gender Specificity of the Effects of Furosemide in Healthy Female and Male Volunteers [Not yet recruiting]
In this study the gender specificity of the effects of furosemide in female and male volunteers will be investigated. The healthy volunteers receive 1. furosemide and 2. aminohippurate sodium "PAH" as single dose. The main objective is gender-specific comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of furosemide in relation to the effect of furosemide (urinary excretion). Secondary objectives are the gender-specific comparison of renal and systemic PAH clearance with the clearance of furosemide and the influence of various genetic polymorphisms on the variability of furosemide pharmacokinetics.

Determination of Kidney Function [Recruiting]
Much more about kidney disorders can be learned by determining kidney function. This research proposes to study the kidneys function by several parameters known as glomerular filtration rate (GFR), Renal Plasma Flow (RPF), and Glomerular Capillary Wall Permselectivity. The study will select patients suffering from different types of kidney diseases. These patients will be selected based on the presence of significant amounts of protein in their urine (proteinuria). Standard blood and urine tests are often unable to provide completely accurate information about the kidney. In order for researchers to have a more accurate idea of kidney function, they will use alternative tests. Test materials (para aminohippurate and inulin) will be injected into patients veins that provides information based on their filtration through the kidneys.

Evaluation of Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 [Not yet recruiting]
Thank you for your interest in our Blood Pressure Research Study. The American Heart Association is sponsoring us to investigate why patients develop high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), and heart disease. There are two parts of our research program. The first part is a screening visit. At this visit you will be given a brief physical exam and will be asked questions concerning your medical history. During the same visit you will have your blood drawn for routine screening and genetic testing. You will also be asked to collect a urine sample for routine screening. If the doctor finds that you are a healthy candidate you will be invited to participate in the second part of the study. During Phase II, we will perform physiological tests after you are placed on a low salt diet and again after you are placed on a higher salt diet. If you are on blood pressure medication, it may be necessary to discontinue taking your present medication for up to three months before beginning the study. Patients discontinuing their current blood pressure medication may be placed on a different blood pressure medication during this 'washout' period if necessary to maintain blood pressure at pre-study levels. Once your blood pressure medications are discontinued, you will be closely monitored. If you do not own a home blood pressure monitor, we will provide one for you to use during the study so that you can keep a daily record of your blood pressure readings. We will ask you to call us every three days to report your blood pressure readings. After you have stopped taking your medication, dietitians at the hospital will make you low salt meals to eat at home for about seven days. On the last day of the low salt diet, you will be asked to begin a 24-hour urine collection that you will bring with you when you are admitted to the hospital that evening. That morning, you will be required to come to the Center for Clinical Investigations (CCI) at Brigham and Women's Hospital for a one-hour test to check if your body is in the correct salt balance. You will return that evening to the CCI where you will be admitted for your study that will occur the next morning. On the morning of your low salt study, we will collect some blood samples. We will also take ultrasound pictures of your heart to see how salt and hormones affect the way your heart and blood vessels functions. These tests will last approximately 5 hours and you will be discharged around 2: 00 PM. For the next 5-7 days, you will be placed on a liberal salt diet. During this diet period, you will eat all your own food, but we will give you some supplements to add to your meals. After 5-7 days on your liberal salt diet, on the morning of your second admission to the hospital, you will be asked to begin a final 24-hour urine collection. That morning, you will again be required to come to the CCI for a blood test, and you will return later that evening to the inpatient CCI where you will be admitted for your final overnight study. The same study that was done for the low salt diet will be repeated for the liberal salt study. You will be discharged at around 2: 00 p. m. These studies will help to determine if you are salt-sensitive. In addition, we hope to learn more about the hormones that regulate your blood pressure and the genes responsible for regulating those hormones. You will be placed back on your initial blood pressure medication (if you are on any) and returned to your regular physician for care. We can also provide clinically relevant information to you.

Vascular Dysfunction in Diabetes: Genes and Hormones [Active, not recruiting]
The investigators are very excited that the National Institutes of Health are sponsoring us to investigate why patients with diabetes are more likely to develop high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), and heart disease. There are two parts of our research program. The first part is a screening visit. At this visit you will be given a brief physical exam and will be asked questions concerning your medical history. During the same visit you will have your blood drawn for routine screening and to prepare DNA for genetic testing. You will also be asked to collect a urine sample for routine screening. If the doctor finds that you are a healthy candidate you will be invited to participate in the second part of the study. During Phase II the investigators will perform physiologic tests after you are placed on a low salt diet and again after you are placed on a high salt diet. All of the food that you will eat during the two diets will be provided to you by the hospital. If you are on blood pressure medication, it may be necessary to discontinue taking your present medication for up to three months before beginning the study. Patients discontinuing their current blood pressure medication may be placed on a different blood pressure medication during this washout period if necessary to maintain blood pressure at pre-study levels. The investigators will take you off all medications, except cholesterol medications two weeks prior to your scheduled in-patient study. However, if you are currently on medication to control your diabetes you will remain on this throughout the entire study. Once your blood pressure medications are discontinued, you will be closely monitored to make sure you do not encounter any difficulty. If you do not own a home blood pressure monitor, the investigators will provide one for to use during the study so that you can keep a daily record of your blood pressure readings. The investigators will ask you to call us every three days to report your blood pressure readings. Less than 20% of patients with hypertension have any significant increase in their blood pressure during this short time off therapy. After you have been off your medication for nine days the dieticians will give you low salt meals to eat at home for six days. On the sixth day of the low salt diet, you will be asked to begin a 24-hour urine collection. You will also be required to come to the Ambulatory Clinical Center (221 Longwood Ave.) for a one-hour test. You will return that evening to the inpatient Clinical Research Center where you will be admitted for your first study that will occur the next morning. On the morning of your low salt study you will have three naturally occurring hormones administered and blood samples drawn from an intravenous needle. The investigators will also take ultrasound pictures of your heart to see how salt and hormones affect the way the heart functions. These tests will last approximately five hours and you will be discharged around 12: 00 p. m. The dieticians will then give you your meals for the next week to take home. Each of these meals will have a high salt content. After six days of your high salt diet, on the morning of your second admission to the hospital, you will be asked to begin a final 24-hour urine collection. The same study that was done for the low salt study will be repeated for the high salt study. You will be discharged around 3: 00 p. m. This study will determine if you are salt-sensitive. A high salt diet has been found to lead to higher blood pressure and weight gain. In addition, the investigators hope to learn more about the hormones that regulate your blood pressure and the genes responsible for regulating those hormones. You will be placed back on your initial blood pressure medication (if you are on any) and returned to your regular physician for care. The investigators will provide clinically relevant information to you and your physician.

more trials >>


Page last updated: 2006-01-31

-- advertisement -- The American Red Cross
 
Home | About Us | Contact Us | Site usage policy | Privacy policy

All Rights reserved - Copyright DrugLib.com, 2006-2015