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Aminocaproic Acid (Aminocaproic Acid) - Summary

 
 



SUMMARY

Aminocaproic Acid Injection, USP is a 6-aminohexanoic acid, which acts as an inhibitor of fibrinolysis.

AMINOCAPROIC ACID is indicated for the following:

Aminocaproic Acid Injection, is useful in enhancing hemostasis when fibrinolysis contributes to bleeding. In life-threatening situations, fresh whole blood transfusions, fibrinogen infusions, and other emergency measures may be required.

Fibrinolytic bleeding may frequently be associated with surgical complications following heart surgery (with or without cardiac bypass procedures), and portacaval shunt; hematological disorders such as aplastic anemia; acute and life-threatening abruptio placentae; hepatic cirrhosis; and neoplastic disease such as carcinoma of the prostate, lung, stomach, and cervix.

Urinary fibrinolysis, usually a normal physiological phenomenon, may frequently be associated with life-threatening complications following severe trauma, anoxia, and shock. Symptomatic of such complications is surgical hematuria (following prostatectomy and nephrectomy) or nonsurgical hematuria (accompanying polycystic or neoplastic diseases of the genitourinary system). (See WARNINGS .)


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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Published Studies Related to Aminocaproic Acid

Epsilon-aminocaproic acid influence in postoperative [corrected] bleeding and hemotransfusion [corrected] in mitral valve surgery. [2010.10]
INTRODUCTION: The epsilon aminocaproic acid is an antifibrinolytic used in cardiovascular surgery to inhibit the fibrinolysis and to reduce the bleeding after CPB. [corrected] OBJECTIVE: To analyze the influence of the using of epsilon aminocaproic acid in the bleeding and in red-cell transfusion requirement in the first twenty-four hours postoperative of mitral valve surgery... CONCLUSION: The epsilon aminocaproic acid was able to reduce the bleeding volume and the red-cell transfusion requirement in the immediate postoperative of patients submitted to mitral valve surgery.

A prospective, randomized, double-blinded single-site control study comparing blood loss prevention of tranexamic acid (TXA) to epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) for corrective spinal surgery. [2010.04.06]
BACKGROUND: Multilevel spinal fusion surgery has typically been associated with significant blood loss. To limit both the need for transfusions and co-morbidities associated with blood loss, the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents has been proposed... Based on current literature and the mechanism by which the medications act, we hypothesize that TXA will be more effective at reducing blood loss than EACA or placebo and result in improved patient outcomes.

A prospective, randomized, double-blinded single-site control study comparing blood loss prevention of tranexamic acid (TXA) to epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) for corrective spinal surgery. [2010]
BACKGROUND: Multilevel spinal fusion surgery has typically been associated with significant blood loss. To limit both the need for transfusions and co-morbidities associated with blood loss, the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents has been proposed... Based on current literature and the mechanism by which the medications act, we hypothesize that TXA will be more effective at reducing blood loss than EACA or placebo and result in improved patient outcomes.

Effect of epsilon aminocaproic acid on red-cell transfusion requirements in major spinal surgery. [2009.09.01]
STUDY DESIGN.: Randomized, placebo-controlled trial.Larger studies are needed to evaluate the relationship between EACA and total RBC requirements.

The effect of epsilon-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin on fibrinolysis and blood loss in patients undergoing primary, isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, noninferiority trial. [2009.07]
BACKGROUND: Until recently, aprotinin was the only antifibrinolytic drug with a licensed indication in cardiac surgery in the United States. The most popular alternative, epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), has not been adequately compared with aprotinin. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that EACA, when dosed appropriately, is not inferior to aprotinin at reducing fibrinolysis and blood loss... CONCLUSIONS: When dosed in a pharmacologically guided manner, EACA is not inferior to aprotinin in reducing fibrinolysis and blood loss in patients undergoing primary, isolated coronary artery bypass surgery.

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Page last updated: 2013-02-10

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