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Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine (Acetaminophen / Caffeine / Dihydrocodeine Bitartrate) - Summary

 
 



SUMMARY

Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine Bitartrate* Tablets CIII
.8 mg/60 mg/32 mg

Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine Bitartrate Tablets are supplied in tablet form for oral administration.

Each tablet contains:

Acetaminophen..........................................................712.8 mg

Caffeine.....................................................................60 mg

Dihydrocodeine Bitartrate*..........................................32 mg

(*Warning: May be habit forming)

Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide), a slightly bitter, white, odorless, crystalline powder, is a non-opiate, non-salicylate analgesic and antipyretic.

Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a bitter, white powder or white-glistening needles, is a central nervous system stimulant.

Dihydrocodeine bitartrate (4,5á-Epoxy-3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6á-ol (+)-tartrate), an odorless, fine white powder is an opioid analgesic.

Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine Bitartrate Tablets are indicated for the relief of moderate to moderately severe pain.


See all Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine indications & dosage >>

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

Media Articles Related to Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine (Acetaminophen / Caffeine / Dihydrocodeine)

Data presented at NANS 2014 demonstrate long-term, low back pain relief with Spectra Spinal Cord Stimulator System
Source: Medical Devices / Diagnostics News From Medical News Today [2014.12.20]
New retrospective data evaluating the Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) Precision Spectra™ Spinal Cord Stimulator (SCS) System demonstrate that the device provided sustained, highly...

Novel agent decreases neuropathic pain in patients with type 2 diabetes
Source: Diabetes News From Medical News Today [2014.12.19]
Molecular Medicine, a peer-reviewed biomedical journal published by the Feinstein Institute Press, published the results of a new study reporting clinically significant pain reduction in type 2...

The difficulties of treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers
Source: Bones / Orthopedics News From Medical News Today [2014.12.15]
Results of treating shoulder pain in baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes are not as predictable as doctors, patients and coaches would like to think, according to a report in the journal...

Commonly prescribed painkiller not effective in controlling lower back pain
Source: Seniors / Aging News From Medical News Today [2014.12.15]
A new study in the journal Neurology shows that pregabalin is not effective in controlling the pain associated with lumbar spinal stenosis, the most common type of chronic lower back pain in older...

Painful Hands, Hurting Hearts?
Source: MedPage Today Rheumatology [2014.12.15]
(MedPage Today) -- Symptomatic hand osteoarthritis was linked with coronary heart disease.

more news >>

Clinical Trials Related to Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Dihydrocodeine (Acetaminophen / Caffeine / Dihydrocodeine)

Acetaminophen for Cancer Pain [Recruiting]
Many patients with cancer pain have pain not fully controlled on opioids (eg. morphine). The addition of acetaminophen (Tylenol) to opioids in a small study in cancer patients demonstrated better pain control without an increase in side effects. This study will determine if regular acetaminophen improves pain control when added to strong opioids in patients with cancer pain.

Effect of Imatinib Mesylate and the Pharmacokinetics of Acetaminophen/Paracetamol in Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase (CML-CP) [Recruiting]
A non-randomized, open-label study to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen/paracetamol in patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP)

A Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Tramadol HCl/Acetaminophen, Hydrocodone Bitartrate/Acetaminophen and Placebo in Patients With Pain From an Ankle Sprain With a Partial Torn Ligament [Completed]
The purpose of this study is to explore the pain-relieving effects and safety of two analgesic treatment regimens as compared to placebo in patients experiencing acute musculoskeletal pain. Patients who are experiencing at least moderate acute musculoskeletal pain from an ankle sprain severe enough to require prescription pain relief medication will be randomized to receive either tramadol HCl/acetaminophen, hydrocodone bitartrate/acetaminophen or placebo.

AVIS - Acetaminophen Before Vaccines for Infants Study [Recruiting]
The purpose of this study is to see whether giving acetaminophen (the medicine in Tylenol) for routine infant vaccinations is helpful in preventing fever or other symptoms.

A Trial Comparing Combination Therapy of Acetaminophen Plus Ibuprofen Versus Tylenol #3 for the Treatment of Pain After Outpatient Surgery [Completed]
Increasingly in general surgery, the investigators are conducting outpatient day surgery. Ambulatory surgery currently comprises 60 to 70% of surgeries performed in North America. These patients all require some form of analgesia which can be taken at home in the first few days after the surgery. The current standard at the investigators' centre and many others in the maritime provinces is to provide a prescription for oral acetaminophen plus codeine or oxycodone (Tylenol #3®, Percocet ®). Some patients may receive more potent opioids such as oral hydromorphone (Dilaudid®). Unfortunately, the most commonly prescribed medication (Tylenol #3®) is often poorly tolerated by patients, has several undesirable side effects, and may not provide effective pain relief. In the investigators' experience, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are uncommonly a routine addition to the home analgesic regimen.

Tylenol #3®, in the investigators' experience and opinion, is a poor post surgical pain medication. They hope to show that a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen is better for pain relief after these procedures. The combination of acetaminophen and ibuprofen would be a safe, cheap, and readily available regimen. Unfortunately, as the prescribing practices of surgeons are old habits, it will require a very convincing argument to get them to change their practices. A randomized controlled trial comparing these two regimens, the investigators hope, would be a powerful enough argument.

The hypothesis of this study, therefore, is that the pain control provided by a combination of acetaminophen plus ibuprofen (650 mg/400 mg four times per day) will be superior to Tylenol #3® (600 mg acetaminophen/60 mg codeine/15 mg caffeine four times per day).

This study will attempt to enroll 150 patients in total. Eligible patients will be identified by their attending surgeon and contacted by study personnel. Patients who enroll in the study will undergo their surgery in the usual manner. After the surgery, in the recovery room, once they are ready to go home, they will be randomized to receive combination A or B and be given a week's worth of pain medication. They will then go home and take this medication as directed. They will record their pain intensity and pain relief once per day using a diary provided in the study package. One week after their surgery, they will return to the hospital clinic and be seen by the study nurse. They will hand over the diary and any unused medication. They will also be asked several questions regarding their overall satisfaction, incidence of side effects, and how long until they were pain free.

The risks of participating in this study are minimal from the risks inherent to the procedures and medications the patients would receive within the standard of care. Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID which is widely available over the counter and has an established safety profile. The most common adverse effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs are gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration. Other less common adverse effects include nephrotoxicity, hypersensitivity reactions, hepatic dysfunction (longterm use), and cognitive dysfunction. The investigators' patients will be selected to exclude those most at risk for these complications (see exclusion criteria). Acetaminophen has few side effects, with no adverse effects on platelet function and no evidence of gastric irritation.

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Page last updated: 2014-12-20

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