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A single-center, double-blind, randomized trial of the atrophogenic effects of fluocinonide cream 0.1% versus clobetasol propionate cream 0.05% in participants with corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses.

Author(s): Uliasz A, Zeichner J, Soung J, Wong V, Lebwohl M

Affiliation(s): Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA. annemarie.uliasz@mssm.edu

Publication date & source: 2008-06, Cutis., 81(6):517-9.

Publication type: Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

To compare the atrophogenic effects of fluocinonide cream 0.1% versus clobetasol propionate cream 0.05%, 20 participants with corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses were randomly assigned to receive fluocinonide cream 0.1% on one arm and clobetasol propionate cream 0.05% on the other arm. Study medications were applied to disease-free target areas on the inner arms twice daily for 2 weeks. The epidermal thickness of pretreatment and posttreatment punch biopsy specimens was measured. Skin examinations were performed evaluating clinical signs of atrophy. No significant reduction in epidermal thickness was observed in the fluocinonide-treated sites (mean, -0.0318 mm; standard deviation, 0.0239; P=.1991). A significant reduction in epidermal thickness was seen in the clobetasol-treated sites (mean, -0.1825 mm; standard deviation, 0.0239; P<.0001). This reduction was significantly greater than results from sites treated with fluocinonide cream 0.1% (difference, -0.1507; standard deviation, 0.0131; P<.0001). Although topical corticosteroids often are the first-line treatment for patients with various dermatoses, a side effect of continuous use is cutaneous atrophy. Our study demonstrated that clobetasol propionate cream 0.05% caused a significantly greater reduction in epidermal thickness compared with fluocinonide cream 0.1% when used twice daily for 2 weeks (P<.001). However, neither drug caused significant clinical signs of atrophy.

Page last updated: 2008-08-11

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