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Minocycline treatment for HIV-associated cognitive impairment: results from a randomized trial.

Author(s): Sacktor N, Miyahara S, Deng L, Evans S, Schifitto G, Cohen BA, Paul R, Robertson K, Jarocki B, Scarsi K, Coombs RW, Zink MC, Nath A, Smith E, Ellis RJ, Singer E, Weihe J, McCarthy S, Hosey L, Clifford DB

Affiliation(s): Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, 4940 Eastern Ave., 301 Building, Suite 2100, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. sacktor@jhmi.edu

Publication date & source: 2011-09-20, Neurology., 77(12):1135-42. Epub 2011 Sep 7.

Publication type: Comparative Study; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

OBJECTIVE: We conducted a study of minocycline to assess its safety, tolerability, and efficacy for the treatment of HIV-associated cognitive impairment. METHODS: HIV-1-infected individuals with progressive neurocognitive decline were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of minocycline. Participants were randomized to receive minocycline 100 mg or matching placebo orally every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change in a neuropsychological test composite z score (NPZ-8) from baseline to week 24. Measures of safety included the frequency of adverse events and changes over time in laboratory tests. After 50% of participants completed the double-blind phase, an interim analysis of futility for the primary outcome measure was performed, and our Data and Safety Monitoring Board recommended early study termination. RESULTS: A total of 107 HIV-1-infected individuals with cognitive impairment were enrolled. The minocycline group did not show improvement in the primary outcome measure (NPZ-8) (mean 24-week change = 0.12) compared to placebo (mean 24-week change = 0.17) (95% confidence interval = [-0.26, 0.39], p = 0.70). There were few severe adverse events or laboratory abnormalities in either treatment group. CONCLUSION: Minocycline was safe and well-tolerated in individuals with HIV-associated cognitive impairment, but cognitive improvement was not observed. Classification of evidence. This interventional study provides Class II evidence for the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of minocycline for the treatment of HIV-associated cognitive impairment.

Page last updated: 2011-12-09

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