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Hypertension and coronary artery disease: a summary of the American Heart Association scientific statement.

Author(s): Rosendorff C

Affiliation(s): Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. clive.rosendorff@med.va.gov

Publication date & source: 2007-10, J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich)., 9(10):790-5.

Publication type: Review

The American Heart Association scientific statement on the treatment of hypertension in the prevention and management of ischemic heart disease was published recently. The main recommendations were as follows: (1) For most adults with hypertension, the blood pressure (BP) goal is <140/90 mm Hg but should be <130/80 [corrected] mm Hg in patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, known coronary artery disease (CAD), CAD equivalents (carotid artery disease, abdominal aortic aneurism, and peripheral vascular disease), or 10-year Framingham risk score of >/=10%. For those with left ventricular dysfunction, the recommended BP target is <120/80 mm Hg. (2) For primary CAD prevention, any effective antihypertensive drug or combination is indicated, but preference is given to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and thiazide diuretics. (3) For the management of hypertension in patients with established CAD (stable or unstable angina, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction), beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors (or ARBs) are the basis of treatment. If further BP lowering is needed, a thiazide diuretic and/or a dihydropyridine CCB (not verapamil or diltiazem) can be added. If a beta-blocker is contraindicated or not tolerated, diltiazem or verapamil can be substituted. (4) If there is left ventricular dysfunction, recommended therapy consists of an ACE inhibitor or ARB, a beta-blocker, and either a thiazide or loop diuretic. In patients with more severe heart failure, an aldosterone antagonist and hydralazine/isosorbide dinitrate (in black patients) should be considered.

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