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Effect of Ondansetron on the Incidence of Vomiting Associated With Ketamine Sedation in Children: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

Author(s): Langston WT, Wathen JE, Roback MG, Bajaj L

Affiliation(s): Department of Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospital of Austin, Austin, TX.

Publication date & source: 2008-03-18, Ann Emerg Med., [Epub ahead of print]

STUDY OBJECTIVE: We investigate the effect of ondansetron on the incidence of vomiting in children who receive intravenous (IV) ketamine for procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department (ED). METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in a children's hospital ED, patients receiving IV ketamine (1 mg/kg) for ED procedures were randomized to receive either IV ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg; maximum 4 mg) or identical placebo. We recorded whether vomiting occurred in the ED postsedation or up to 12 hours after discharge with telephone follow-up and compared ED length of stay and parental satisfaction. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-seven children were randomized to placebo and 128 to ondansetron. The groups were similar in age, sex, and fasting duration. ED vomiting was less common with ondansetron: 6 of 128 (4.7%) versus 16 of 127 (12.6%), P=.02, difference 7.9% (95% confidence interval 1.1% to 14.7%), number needed to treat 13. Follow-up was successful in 82.7%, with vomiting in the ED or after discharge less frequent with ondansetron: 10 of 128 (7.8%) versus 24 of 127 (18.9%), P=.01, difference 11.1% (95% confidence interval 2.7% to 19.5%), number needed to treat 9. ED length of stay and parental satisfaction were similar between groups. CONCLUSION: IV ondansetron significantly reduces the incidence of vomiting associated with IV ketamine procedural sedation in children.

Page last updated: 2008-03-26

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