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Effects of physiological covariables on pharmacokinetic parameters of clomipramine in a large population of cats after a single oral administration.

Author(s): Lainesse C, Frank D, Beaudry F, Doucet M

Affiliation(s): Departement de Biomedecine Veterinaire, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.

Publication date & source: 2007-04, J Vet Pharmacol Ther., 30(2):116-26.

Publication type: Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

This study was conducted to confirm an interindividual variability in pharmacokinetic parameters of clomipramine in a large population of cats and to identify potential covariables that would explain the presence of such pharmacokinetic variability after a single dose of Clomicalm. Clomipramine hydrochloride was administered orally according to a weight-dose chart from 0.32 to 0.61 mg/kg, to 76 cats and five blood samples were then taken by direct venipuncture at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Plasma concentrations of clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine (DCMP) were measured by LC-MS/MS. The Standard Two-Stage technique was used to assess differences and detect correlations between pharmacokinetic parameter estimates and individual covariables. A large interindividual variability in all pharmacokinetic parameters (CV% 64-124) was detected. Statistically significant gender-related differences were detected in MR and Cl/F, where female cats had a higher mean MR (0.53) and faster Cl/F (0.36 L/h.kg) than males (0.36 and 0.21 L/h.kg, respectively). No correlation could be found between clomipramine AUC0-24 h or DCMP AUC0-24 h and sedation scores. Further feline studies are required to assess these findings after multiple dosing of clomipramine and DCMP to allow clinical extrapolation.

Page last updated: 2007-05-03

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