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The 40-mg dose of eletriptan: comparative efficacy and tolerability versus sumatriptan 100 mg.

Author(s): Diener HC, Ryan R, Sun W, Hettiarachchi J

Affiliation(s): Department of Neurology, University of Essen, Essen, Germany. h.diener@uni-essen.de

Publication date & source: 2004-02, Eur J Neurol., 11(2):125-34.

Meta-analysis provides valuable information regarding relative efficacies of triptans, but head-to-head comparator studies remain the gold standard. Three similar head-to-head trials comparing eletriptan 40 mg (E40) with sumatriptan 100 mg (S100) provide a rare opportunity and sufficient power, for robust comparisons of efficacy. Data were combined from three double-blind, placebo-controlled, first-dose, first-attack acute migraine treatment studies comparing E40 (n=1132), S100 (n=1129), and placebo (n=645). The primary outcome was headache response at 2 h. Secondary outcomes included headache response at 1 h, pain-free and functional responses, and sustained headache and pain-free responses. Odds ratios were calculated for summary estimates of probability of response. There were higher headache response rates with eletriptan versus sumatriptan at 2 h (67% vs. 57%; P<0.0001) and 1 h (34% vs. 26%; P<0.0001). Eletriptan also had higher 2 h pain-free (35% vs. 25%; P<0.0001) and functional responses (67% vs. 58%; P<0.0001). Sustained headache (42%) and pain-free (22%) response rates were higher for eletriptan versus sumatriptan (34%, P<0.0001; 15%, P<0.0001). The probability of response for eletriptan versus sumatriptan ranged from 36% higher (relief of nausea) to 64% higher (sustained pain-free rate). Combined analysis demonstrates that E40 has superior efficacy versus S100 across all clinically relevant outcomes.

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