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Epsilon-aminocaproic acid influence in postoperative [corrected] bleeding and hemotransfusion [corrected] in mitral valve surgery.

Author(s): Benfatti RA, Carli AF, Silva GV, Dias AE, Goldiano JA, Pontes JC

Affiliation(s): UFMS, Campo Grande, MS, Brasil. ricardobenfatti@gmail.com

Publication date & source: 2010-10, Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc., 25(4):510-5.

Publication type: Randomized Controlled Trial

INTRODUCTION: The epsilon aminocaproic acid is an antifibrinolytic used in cardiovascular surgery to inhibit the fibrinolysis and to reduce the bleeding after CPB. [corrected] OBJECTIVE: To analyze the influence of the using of epsilon aminocaproic acid in the bleeding and in red-cell transfusion requirement in the first twenty-four hours postoperative of mitral valve surgery. METHODS: Prospective studying, forty-two patients, randomized and divided in two equal groups: group #1 control and group #2--epsilon aminocaproic acid. In Group II were infused five grams of EACA in the induction of anesthesia, after full heparinization, CPB perfusate after reversal of heparin and one hour after the surgery, totaling 25 grams. In group I, saline solution was infused only in those moments. RESULTS: Group #1 showed average bleeding volume of 633.57 +/- 305,7 ml, and Group #2, an average of 308.81 +/- 210.1 ml, with significant statistic difference (P = 0.0003). Average volume of red-cell transfusion requirement in Groups 1 and 2 was, respectively, 942.86 +/- 345.79 ml and 214.29 +/- 330.58 ml, with significant difference (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The epsilon aminocaproic acid was able to reduce the bleeding volume and the red-cell transfusion requirement in the immediate postoperative of patients submitted to mitral valve surgery.

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